Centipedes in kitchen sink

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My g/f finds a centipede in her kitchen's double-bowl stainless sink many mornings. Before going to bed, she plugs both drains with standard stoppers (so they can't be coming upwards from below the drains) and dries both bowls.
She believes that if she leave the fluorescent ceiling light on all night, there won't be centipedes in the morning. Still need many more night to confirm that theory.
She lives in an apartment whose floor is below outside soil grade by two or three feet. (The apartment still has full-size double-hung windows.) Just moved in two months ago, so she doesn't know if this is a long-term problem.
I've made a casual inspection around the outside perimeter of her apartment. Nothing obvious (like cracks or wall penetrations or termite mud tubes) to my amateur eye. Inside, under the kitchen sink she doesn't see any activity.
While the recent weather in central New Jersey has been humid, the real question is how do the bugs find their way into the sink? They are not falling from a hole in the ceiling above the sink. There is a double-hung window above the faucets, but it's always closed. When I was there last night, I didn't think to inspect for openings at the bottom of the window frame.
Even though she knows they eat many harmful insects, she wants them OUT.
Thanks for your suggestions.
R1
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On 7/17/2013 9:16 AM, Rebel1 wrote:

I think they are fairly seasonal in damp basements, especially. I would try perimiter spray for insects to try to remove the food source. Dehumidifier? Is there a sump pit in the building? That is a great hangout forr centipedes.
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On 7/17/2013 11:01 AM, Norminn wrote:

No sump pit. Dehumidifier is a real possibility, since it will also heat the cold apartment. The apartment is cold because the thermostat for the a/c is located in the apartment above, which is much warmer because of numerous large windows.
I'm just amazed that it seems that the 'pedes can climb vertically from the floor, up the doors below the sink, and into the sink.
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> I'm just amazed that it seems that the 'pedes can climb vertically from > the floor, up the doors below the sink, and into the sink. No, I expect they're crawling up your sink's drain piping.
Even if you don't have a sump pit or basement, depending on where you live, your building can be serviced by separate storm and sanitary sewers, or a combined sewer. Centipedes and other insects can crawl up through the drain pipes and end up in your kitchen sink, laundry room sink or bathrub.
I would collect a few 5 gallon pails and fill them full of water. Dump them in your kitchen drain (and probably all your other drains too) as fast as possible without spilling water all over the floor. Hopefully, that'll wash any bugs in the smaller drain piping within your building back into the city sewer system.
Alternatively, maybe fill the sinks with water before pulling the plugs and then pour the 5 gallon pails in to maintain maximum water flow through the drain piping to wash the bugs away.
I'd suggest leaving something like bleach or oven cleaner in your p-trap to provide a more lethal barrier to the bugs, but every time you drain water down your sink, that bleach or oven cleaner is going to get washed away. And, if you have metal traps under your kitchen sink, it could cause them to corrode.
--
nestork


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On 7/17/2013 12:47 PM, nestork wrote:

She's tried close to what you suggested, pouring large amounts of water down the drain followed by bleach. No success. She can fill the stoppered sinks with water and it stays in the sinks. In other words, no tiny openings for the water to drain out and the bugs to crawl up through. She's tried spraying the drains with a bug killer and then covering them.
She's also has sprayed the window frames (all three windows, not just the one above the sink), and baseboards. I was only half-way jesting when I suggested aiming a security camera at the sink and watching how they approach.
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I'd say it's safe to conclude that the centipedes are not coming up the drain.
Look for some other way they are getting in.
Also, if possible, wake up in the middle of the night, walk into the kitchen and turn the lights on. If you find a few trapped in the sink, there might be a lot more around than the ones you see.
--
Dan Espen

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On 7/17/2013 3:10 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

I'll try that next time I sleep over. She would be too freaked out at the possibility of finding many of them in the middle of the night. She's irrational about bugs. A few weeks ago we were sitting on a bench at the seashore, and a ladybug landed on her thigh, which was covered by her jeans. She couldn't brush it off. I had to.
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Rebel1 wrote:

Good grief, dump her. No telling what other psychosis may emerge if the relationship continues.
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Rebel1 wrote:

Didn't you say, "Before going to bed, she plugs both drains with standard stoppers (so they can't be coming upwards from below the drains) and dries both bowls"? Are they pushing the stoppers out? :-)
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Disregard the above comment. Senior moment!
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In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 7/17/2013 1:29 PM, willshak wrote:

That's exactly what she does. And the stoppers are in place in the morning. She just told me that if she fills the sinks with water, the water stays in them "forever." In other words, there are not small openings in the stoppers big enough for a 'pede to crawl up through.
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Rebel1 wrote:

Yeah, my reading comprehension is going the way of my short term memory loss. :-)
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In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Wednesday, July 17, 2013 11:53:17 AM UTC-7, Rebel1 wrote:

ss sink >>>>> many mornings. Before going to bed, she plugs both drains wit h >>>>> standard >>>>> stoppers (so they can't be coming upwards from below the drains) and >>>>> dries both bowls. >>>>> >>>>> She believes that if s he leave the fluorescent ceiling light on all >>>>> night, there won't be c entipedes in the morning. Still need many more >>>>> night to confirm that theory. >>>>> >>>>> She lives in an apartment whose floor is below outside soil grade >>>>> by two >>>>> or three feet. (The apartment still has full- size double-hung >>>>> windows.) >>>>> Just moved in two months ago, so she doesn't know if this is a >>>>> long-term >>>>> problem. >>>>> >>>>> I've made a casual inspection around the outside perimeter of her >>>>> apartmen t. Nothing obvious (like cracks or wall penetrations or >>>>> termite >>>>> mud tubes) to my amateur eye. Inside, under the kitchen sink she >>>>> doe sn't >>>>> see any activity. >>>>> >>>>> While the recent weather in centra l New Jersey has been humid, the >>>>> real >>>>> question is how do the bu gs find their way into the sink? They are not >>>>> falling from a hole in the ceiling above the sink. There is a >>>>> double-hung window above the f aucets, but it's always closed. When >>>>> I was >>>>> there last night, I didn't think to inspect for openings at the bottom >>>>> of the window fram e. >>>>> >>>>> Even though she knows they eat many harmful insects, she wan ts them >>>>> OUT. >>>>> >>>>> Thanks for your suggestions. >>>>> >>>>> R1

source. >>>> Dehumidifier? Is there a sump pit in the building? That is a g reat >>>> hangout forr centipedes. >>> >>> No sump pit. Dehumidifier is a r eal possibility, since it will also >>> heat the cold apartment. The apartm ent is cold because the thermostat >>> for the a/c is located in the apartm ent above, which is much warmer >>> because of numerous large windows. >>>

dn't you say, >> "Before going to bed, she plugs both drains with standard

gard the above comment. Senior moment! That's exactly what she does. And th e stoppers are in place in the morning. She just told me that if she fills the sinks with water, the water stays in them "forever." In other words, th ere are not small openings in the stoppers big enough for a 'pede to crawl up through.
Note: google access is screwing up everything ...again!
Recommend barrier type spray, stumbled across Bug Barrier by Raid at Walmar t with an 'introductory pricing, so tried and was surprised to see how effe ctive it was. Here in AZ EVERYTHING likes to crawl through the 'high end' w indows and sliding doors. Constantly find centipedes that only make it abou t 6 feet into the house. Barrier lasta 12 months, but I've been putting it on every 6 months. Seems the centipedes find some' opening and then head fo r the water in the sinks.
I've heard Home Defense at Home Depo works well too.
Just for fun tell her the centipedes crawl across her silverware in the dra wers on the way to the sink. No, that's TOO mean.
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On Thu, 18 Jul 2013 13:07:06 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

Well you could leave the silverware on one side of the sink and see if the centipedes crawl over it, or if they are repelled by silver, like Dracula is iirc killed by a silver bullet.
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<stuff snipped>

Vampires are killed by wooden stakes, werewolves require silver bullets.
--
Bobby G.



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wrote:

Ants can do it and they have only 6 legs. Should it be 1/16th as hard for a centipede?
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Seems to me, I've seen centipedes zip along on the underside of various objects. Vertical is nothing for them. Of course that depends on the surface. They might get stuck in sinks, but I'd be surprised if they did.
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Dan Espen

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We've got them by the busload and they do indeed get trapped in sinks and bathtubs and despite their many legs, cannot crawl out. I believe that they just can't get a good hold on porcelain or similar materials. It's a case of "I've fallen and I can't get up!" That's what makes people think they are coming up from the drain but that's not the case. A shot of very hot water kills them instantly and dismembers them, too, so for a few seconds there are dozens of unattached legs skittering about.
https://www.extension.iastate.edu/news/2007/feb/072301.htm
<<If house centipedes are too abundant for comfort, dry up and vacuum clean, as much as possible, the areas that serve as habitat and food source for centipedes. These are the darkest, hardest to reach areas of the house such as under shelves, behind stored boxes, behind the washing machine and so forth. Residual insecticides for indoor insect control can be used, but the benefit will be little to none.>>
I've trained my Jack Russell to catch them and she does a damn good job. Apparently they emit either an odor or a sound that she can smell or hear because she often bolts upright in the bed in the middle of the night, jumps down and nails one cold. She sucks the legs off but leaves the body intact which she then rolls in. (Yuk!) First animal I ever had that earned its keep! Since she gets a slice of salami for every kill, she's become vigilant about policing all the dark, dank areas of the house looking for 'pedes.
--
Bobby G.




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On 7/17/2013 5:53 PM, micky wrote:

I love your logic. However, Wikipedia says they can have anywhere from under 20 to over 300 legs.
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wrote:

What chaos. I think there should be either state or federal regulation of how many legs they have.
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