cementing a 3 x 3 feet opening

A few years ago I had my front yard covered with cement. I had them leave me a 3 x 3 foot opening for a future shrub. Since then, everything I tried to plant in that opening..died on me. It faces south. Now, i want to complete that yard by covering it. I bought quikcrete or quikcement bag. I hesitate in doing for the reasons that follow: It may not match the rest of the cemented yard and most of all, I do not how to get it started. I seem to recall when it was done, the men laid metal bars. Would I have to do the same for such a size? Thanks
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Greetings,
Mix up a batch according to the instructions on the bag and see what colour it turns out AFTER IT IS DRY. If it is close use it. If it is far off you might need to switch brands, add pigment, or mix your own using sand of a similar colour to that used originally. You shouldn't need "metal bars" for a 3x3' opening but I am sure someone here will argue with me. If it makes you feel better purchase some "rebar" from a home supply store and put it into the middle of your slab.
Hope this helps, William
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Boothbay wrote:

http://www.niehs.nih.gov/kids/lyrics/bigyellow.htm
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South isn't the problem. The ground under the existing concrete is dry as a bone, and any water you gave to the plant quickly wicked into the dry ground. Or alternatively, a lot of rain water ran off the concrete into the hole and you drowned the plants.
Guess you don't want a lecture about why paving over a lawn is terrible for the environment, huh?
I do disagree with the poster who said not to worry about the rebar, although you could use alternatives to rebar. The problem I see is if the soil at the hole isn't sufficiently compacted. Your patch could drop. Or maybe not. But I don't see any result that, at best, won't look like a 3x3 patch.
--
Doug Boulter

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Use the old architectural or design method: "If you cannot make it match, make it a contrast so it looks like you intended it to be that way". Set a few paving bricks in the opening, stand a fountain or statue on the space, build up the sides to make a raised garden and plant a few flowers in it. There are many ways to feature it instead of hiding it.

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Wow, a paved yard. And one without a single bush... I think I'm going to be ill...
-Tim
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The b*tch accross the street took an attractive house and converted it to a BLOB! Many owners prior to her had the brick posts aside the driveway with light fixtures on top lit every night, 20+ years since we've been here. After closure they were lit ONE evening until she saw them. NO plantings against the house and wont be until the cement is removed. Parking strip had weeds and straggly bottle brush tree but no longer, now cement. People used to stop in the fall and ask what the tree was in the front yard, liquid amber it WAS until she tore it out. Shutters near windows used to look good, gone. Pebbles cover what WAS a planter next to the driveway.
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