Cement placer

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I'm trying to put a fan into a 12-inch thick brick wall. Diameter is about 8 inches. Naturally I don't have an 8 inch masonry bit (and I wouldn't like to pay the cost) so the next best thing is to cut through enough bricks to make a squarish hole though which the fan will fit. But that leaves small gaps on each side which I'd like to fill in with mortar. I should also mention that I can only get to the inside; the fan (really the vent part) is lowered from a higher floor using a string duct-taped in place. When it's where I want it one strong tug and it's free. So I have to push the mortar in from the inside and it's a pain in the butt. Push as far as possible using hands and then use a dowel to push it all the way and hopefully compact it.
Well there's actually a miniature tool that I could use to do the job. You know when you have a filling at the dentist: he does his drilling and then uses a thing that looks like a tube with a piston inside to place the amalgam in the cavity. He then tamps the amalgam down with another instrument.
Upsize that tube with a piston to 1/2 inch (or maybe have a range of sizes from 1/2 to 2 inches), pack it with mortar and then push the piston home to place the mortar deep into the hole. Now where can I get such a tool?
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On Aug 31, 1:24 am, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

On the off chance the OP is not a troll, the OP should learn how to use cold chisels to properly cut through the concrete block in order to create the desired shape and size of opening needed...
Yet another fabulous example of someone making a mountain out of a mole hill...
Why make a round hole for something in a concrete wall when *I* don't want to pay for someone with the correct size concrete hole saw to come out and make the cut... Surely there is no other way to make a round hole in a concrete block wall other than using an mighty expensive drill bit... Then let me concoct the most "rube goldberg-esque" manner possible to pack mortar into the gaps *I* never should have created in the first place...
~~ Evan
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Evan wrote:

Yep. One can rent concrete hole saws in almost any size. They're used for placing floor safes or routing pipes.
Wonder what the OP plans when the fan quits working?
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when the cut from inside is nearly thru the bricks outside will likely spall falling outward..... OP needs exterior access.
better to install just a exhaust outlet with the actual fan somehere else indoors easy to service
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Not true. Bricks are strongly held in place.

No. No problem with service.
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So... They cost money don't they? More than a cold chisel, mini-sledge, ladder and myself and, I would guess, my rube-goldberg placer.

Same as I do with the other fans: remove the inside grill, unscrew the fan (it fits in the sleeve) and replace as necessary. The sleeve and the flap generally don't go wrong but if they were to I'd cut them out from the inside and replace.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

Yep. You're right. A 6" concrete core drill costs between $66 and $77 per day to rent. At this place: http://www.sunbeltrentals.com/equipment/category.aspx?id=s520
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I defy _you_ to use cold chisels and make a neat hole through an existing wall either brick or block.
As for the OP. Without a hole saw you are going to come out with one ugly, ragged, oversized hole.
Harry K
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If you only use cold chisels perhaps not however masonry bits drilling a succession of holes around the perimeter help keep it round.

Only by a small amount covered by the outside flange and then with packed-in mortar.
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That makes it "sort of" round. There will be a serrated or scalloped edge to it. Varying with the bit diameter, the hole can easily be too large or too small depending on where you place the tip of the bit when you drill. Not to mention the bit must be held very straight or the hole on the opposite side will be a mess.
It is probably one of the better methods, but still has a lot of potential for problems.
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I tried that method going through the "cavity" section of a block wall. Still came out with a very rough hole and way oversize. That was with a 1/2" homeowner "hammer drill". I'll never try that again. It may be possible by renting a hammer drill with both drill and chisel bits though.
OP hasn't said if his wall is solid brick, concrete block or what. He did say brick I know but unless it is a very old house it won't be soldi brick, more like a brick facade.
Harry K
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Harry, first line of my original post:
"I'm trying to put a fan into a 12-inch thick brick wall. ..."
The building is about 110 years old and when I say 12-inch thick brick wall" I mean solid brick. No cavities. I believe there are 3 layers although I could be wrong about that. Inside the outside brick wall there are furring strips and then lath and plaster. Sometimes a layer of sheetrock over them or sometimes lath and sheetrock or sometimes just sheetrock depending on how I can deal with the door and window surrounds.
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Harry K wrote:

Michalangelo carved "David" with a cold chisel and a mallet.
'Course he was working in marble, a medium softer than concrete (I think).
Plus, he was Italian...
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Its pretty easy to do. You just chop away anything that does not look like David.
Truth is, the finish on the statue is absolutely amazing, as is the detail. It is made from Carrara marble. The marble contains many microscopic holes and it may help in sculpting.
On Sept 27 I'll be returning to Galleria Dell'Accademia . (already bought the tickets) to admire not only David but a few other works by Michelangelo. It is incredible to see close up.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I heard that as a response to the question "How do you make a sculpture of, say, a rabbit?"
I didn't know the technique would also work for David.
I learn something new every day.
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That is exactly how Michelangelo explained what he did. He was just revealing the statue that he already saw within. Of course that was Michelangelo....
Interesting bit of Italian political trivia from Wikipedia:
""David is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture created between 1501 and 1504, by the Italian artist Michelangelo. It is a 5.17 metre (17 foot)[1] marble statue of a standing male nude. The statue represents the Biblical hero David, a favoured subject in the art of Florence.[2] Originally commissioned as one of a series of statues of prophets to be positioned along the roofline of the east end of Florence Cathedral, the statue was instead placed in a public square, outside the Palazzo della Signoria, the seat of civic government in Florence, where it was unveiled on 8 September 1504.
******Because of the nature of the hero that it represented, it soon came to symbolize the defense of civil liberties embodied in the Florentine Republic, an independent city-state threatened on all sides by more powerful rival states and by the hegemony of the Medici family. The eyes of David, with a warning glare, were turned towards Rome.******[3]
The statue was moved to the Accademia Gallery in Florence in 1873, and later replaced at the original location by a replica.""

Sigh! Wish I could get back to Firenze to behold the Davide again. And to Rome to see the ceiling at the Sistina, which has been cleaned since last I lived there, and is supposed to be INCREDIBLE with the gunk of centuries removed...
So many places...so little time...
HB
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We saw it about 5 years ago. It is every bit as beautiful as you may imagine.
They could have save a lot of money though, just using a few gallons of Sears ceiling paint.
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Maybe you should learn to read: It's not concrete block, it's brick. Maybe you should also explain this fantastic skill of properly cutting a round hole: perhaps Evan in a You Tube spectacular!

Your opinion.

You have a better method of packing the mortar? Let's hear it.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

PVC pipe and a dowel. If dowel is too big - or you are using a big diameter of pipe - whittle down a piece of wood. Good luck with packing mortar into a 1/2" diameter tube. There are also grout bags, look like a cake icing bag. I bought one once, tried it once, threw it away.
I think your nym is appropriate.
--

dadiOH
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Why not have a commercially made one?

You have a point, maybe 1/2 is too small.

Even my wife suggested that but the nozzle is too short. It has to be at least 12 inches long.

Thank you!
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