Cement Board -Where to install in bathroom?

I just ripped out everything from an outdated bathroom, tile walls, tile floor and tile shower. I discovered severe water damage to the plaster - lathe and sheetrock in the shower area. I would like to repair the damage and install new tile.
Where does cement board go in a bathroom? If shower, how high? Should I install cement board on the floor before installing tile? Would plywood and metal lathe work just fine on the floor?
Thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As high as the tile. Ours is tiled right to the top of the walls and ceiling so its cement board, all round. Our bath has sheetrock walls, textured and painted where there isn't any water.

No. What is the floor right now ..Ply ? How thick ? Is it in good shape ?
If so, I might add a layer of 1/2" ply screwed and glued to the existing floor and tile over that ..unless you expect a lot of water on the floor. Is the "floor" of the shower a "pan" or tile or ??
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you for your response.
The sub-floor I removed was particle board. You can imagine how bad it was after years of water damage. The floor tiles came up with no effort. Under that is typical thick boards used in old houses.
I guess 1 " plywood would do the trick.
Thanx
On 7/3/05 1:48 AM, in article 0%Kxe.1859128$6l.901982@pd7tw2no, "Rudy"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Vinnie Boombotts wrote:

Particle board substrate eh?
do a google groups search for posts from myself and one or two other knowledgable folks like RicoJour, Dan C, Charles Spitzer, dadiOH and a few others, regarding this and other tile issues.
And do not under any circumstances take advice from Rudy. He advocates using for a substrate the very crap (particle board) you're removing. Rudy's nothing more than an unhappy homeowner whose builder screwed him on his tile installation (which he ignorantly and vehemently defends). In order to nurse his wounds he attempts to give tile advice here.
Go figure...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, If you would READ the post, it says the GC around here advocates using particle board over the sub floor. I said I nixed that and used PLYWOOD over the subfloor. I am a satisfied homeowner BTW but a "know it all" like you couldn't comprehend that.
R

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since G Henslee is such a Newsgroup Wizard, I suppose it should be an easy task for him to pull the quote/post.. Where I advocated using "particle board" and to repost it here.
The one in the thread I'm reading says PLYWOOD
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rudy wrote:

Blah ,blah, blah. I know what you said. Your 'upgarde' to 3/8" ply is is no better than the other crap. Neither are accceptable by any trade or professional standards.
Your 'General' with his 500K roach motels and his 3/8" particle board substrates is screwed and he screwed you. You hould have used 1/4" Hardi. Have a meeting with your neighbors who got screwed as well and consult an attorney when the grout starts cracking. Quit bothering people with inferior advice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This tile setter has done over 30 homes in the neighborhood, using the two substrates previously mentioned. I've asked several of the homeowners if they have had any grout cracking and none have had any problems Someof these homes are over 5 years old.
So when it comes to a choice of "what works" VS your "trade standards" whining, I'll take what works, but by all means, keep up your 'policing' of the newsgroup, Chief

JAWOHL ! Oberleutnant.. The MAN has spoken !
BTW, how many tile floors have you installed in the last 5 years ?

Now theres an intelligent retort. Do you really want to get into a "my house is nicer than your house" and "my Dad can beat up your Dad" For someone that purports to know so much about everything, it actually seems that your communications skills could use some work. After you pass Communications 101, maybe you should sign up for a course in ASP 101 (anal sand pounding)- but then you'd already know all about that too wouldn't you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rudy bleated loudly:

30 homes??? When I had crewS we never got out of bed for less than 300 - 500 homes a year. Low end tracts to high end developments, not to mention commercial projects.
My credentials don't mean shit to anyone in usenet, 'cept me. But at least I have some. You're just an old squawking fool with your 3/8" plywood and particle board substrates that will fail eventually.

You took what the crook gave you.
Get this: ANSI A108/A118/A136-1999 American National Standard Specifications for the Installation of Ceramic Tile
Oh wait, (Shaw Residential Internet) Hey no wonder you don't GET IT. You're a Canuck! Nevermind, the aforementioned publication won't apply. Your builder never had any standards to begin with anyway. You don't either or you wouldn't insist on giving inferior advice to the unassuming.
- end of subject
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Vinnie Boombotts wrote:

Walls in shower and tubs. As a floor substrate.

Yes. Keeping a properly built subfloor in mind, I recommend HardiBacker. Their 1/4" product affords greater density than the 1/2" cementious board.

In and of itself, no. A plywood subfloor that incorporates a 1" mortar bed, yes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I always put it on the ceiling. My dick is so big I often piss on the ceiling so this protects it.
On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 00:14:35 -0400, Vinnie Boombotts

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.