Cement board/ceramic and a lam. question

In applying cement board to the floor in order to install tile, do I need to remove glued down 25 year old Congoleum? It is secure, the wood that it is glued to is secure, so is there any reason why it can't just stay right there? Thanks.
Same question applying to installing click laminate flooring? (not about installing a cement board, but about leaving the congoleum)
Perry
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No need to remove in either case. You do know you need 1 1/4" of subfloor for under tile? (this doesn't include the non structural cement board underlayment). Some vinyl floors are installed over only 3/4" subfloor.

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Everybody is cement-board happy. I don't like using it on floors because it has no tensile strength. Use cementboard on walls. As a professional I use hardibacker on floors due to it's tougher tensile strength and compression strength, and it doesn't expand and contract. It is also highly water resistant.
A good alternative for the average DIY homeowner would be exterior-grade (CDX) plywood. A 1/2" layer glued and screwed over a 3/4" existing floor would give the needed 1 1/4" subfloor to receive tile (use exterior grade screws- NOT drywall screws). Exterior-grade plywood can be gone over with multi-purpose thinset* and is the "correct" type of plywood to use for tiling. Look on the back of any brand or type of multi-purpose (polymer modified) thinset, and you'll see "exterior grade plywood" listed as an acceptable surface for it's use. It is also very resistant to moisture. It is what roofers use (in Florida anyway) under roofing. It is also inexpensive, easy to cut and easy for a homeowner to work with.
NOTE: this would only be for interior use, where the temperature and humidity is kept at a relative constant. Plywood will expand and contract in temp. extremes. *Always use the highest quality "flex-set" thinset over plywood.
thetiler
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I've grown so fond of it that I use it on both walls and floors in its various thicknesses depending on thickness need of the job. A pure joy to cut also.
Regards, Ed
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