Cell phone scanners

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Pop wrote:

The federal code applies to interstate calls, doesn't it?
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Yes, they listen all the time. None of them are going on any emergency calls. When you see any fire truck, they're simply cruising for cell phone calls. Same with police and ambulances.
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You'll find this interesting: http://www.binghamelectronics.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode 80XLT
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Should work on older analog phones. May receive data from digital phones, but you won't be able to understand it.
Stretch
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Yes, they do, depending. I myself have an old Uniden that picks them up because it predates the regs. They're a nuisance though, more than anything else; I have the scanner skip the entire bands. There are many ways to also accidentally listen in on cell phone calls; it happens on evrything form walkie talkies to stereo systems of the cheapier variety. Also, the newer greqs being sold off and spread spectrum finally getting bigger, listening is going down a lot.
Law Enforcement can only intentionally listen in on a phone call by court order and then there are regs on what they must hear in the firs xx seconds before they can listen longer. Lots of rules. But, that doesn't stop your next door neighbor, with the same phone, from accidentally picking yours up at times, even thougth it won't happen oftern.
Never consider any kind of communication "private": They just aren't. Except for spread spectrum, it's real easy to get hold of cell phone signals with a simple PLL design at most any experimenter's bench.
Pop
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does that mean "law enforcement" as in regular squad cars? The ones that run around here have at least six antennas that are clearly in view. If the cop on the beat had the equipment I suspect that the equipment is relatively available.
Again, we must distinguish between digital and analogue in the above discussion. Apparently Analogue scanners with the capability of receiving 800 MHZ cell phone converswations are still being marketed as one poster gave a link for one.
Doesn't seem to far fetched to intercept a digital conversation since all phones have the circuit to do the demodulation and only would need the phone number of the phone being intercepted to weed out other traffic. Sounds as simple as reprogramming a SIM card maybe. . Any way to know if your cell phone is communicating D or A if both are available to you. Can a phone be locked into one or the other mode?

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===> Yes, it does. Some of those antenna's are for duplex operation vs. one way, and others are shared systems for other depts such as fire, rescue, air, rescue, and so on. Many of the latest systems on the market won't even had a visible antenna. There's a plethora of variables in what they can have, including fully computerized systems where channel availability is controlled by the "base" stations or the one in the area they're connected to.

===> Yes, they are, and they're cheaper for the most part because of the age of the technology. Then there is quite an installed base out there already in place.

===> Not sure what you mean by all phones have the circuit to do the demod, but no, that's not true as I intepret your comment. Digital opens up so many new possibilities and is not "demodulated" anything like an analog signal. But, at this point, ANY phone, digital or analog must, by federallaw, be capable of being intercepted, just as any encryption used must be known and allowed by federal requirements. Even with all that, EVERY phone, line or cell, analog or digital, must by its very nature pass through equipment that creates an interception point by the unscrupolous, any anyone with the right equipment can intercept any phone call if they know the technology used in making the call. Many people don't realize either that a digital call originated in say Chgo may go back and forth from digital to analog to digital etc., as it routes to its destination. I made a mistake in my earlier post, too: Feds et al when tapping, can "listen" to any or all of the calls they can find, but they can only "record" relevant phone calls. If the conversation goes off topic for too long, they must pause or cease recording if what they're getting isn't "on topic" for the court order. It doesn't matter what phone you use; just never consider it totally private because it isn't. Digital taps are definitely more complex equipment wise, and it keeps a lot of companies in business in North America and Europe.
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Do you mean to say that for example, my new Verizon digital cell phone can be easily monitored by my neighbor, especially if he is a firefighter?

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While reading this group I can hear all your cell conversations. I record each and every one of them. They'll be put on CD and sold at WalMart.
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i been scannin or quite some time. you can pick them up if they use the 800 and 900 megahertz range.they used trunked system now witch means they change frequencies every few minutes so you cn her em till they change... older home portable phones use the 40-50 mgz range . newer ones 900mgz.
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