Ceiling Paint - Prime First?

I'm going to paint a ceiling (standard 'ceiling white') that hasn't been painted in roughly 10 years. It's not really all that dirty for being so old, so I'll probably just wipe it with STP or the like. Should be no problem with new paint adhering to the old. But here's the question... I want to be able to cover with the least number of coats possible. Would priming it first be likely to cut the total number of coats (including the primer coat) needed? TIA. ---Mick
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If you wipe it with STP, nothing will stick to it.
BB
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STP goes in motors TSP is soap. If it isnt dirty dont wash it. TSP without good rinsing can leave streaks in new paint. If it is a kitchen or greasy area wash. Otherwise use the best paint
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<< I'll probably just wipe it with STP or the like. >>
Did you mean TSP, trisodium phosphate?
<< I want to be able to cover with the least number of coats possible. Would priming it first be likely to cut the total number of coats (including the primer coat) needed? >>
Probably, yes. If you use a primer tinted for the ceiling color you could get by with primer + topcoat. The finish coat would need to have exceptional hiding power and your technique must be first class. Consumer Reports can offer some help on which paint would meet your needs Good luck.
Joe
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Since the ceiling already has paint on it, STP, or TSP is not required unless it's a kitchen ceiling and therefore, might be greasy. Just keep the roller loaded with paint and don't get too carried away with rolling it out.
Ya know, they now make a ceiling paint that goes on with a pink tint but dries white. This really helps ensure you don't miss spots. I just used it and it works. H-D, Lowes, etc.

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it MIGHT require a coat of primer. if it does, and you dont, youll be painting over what you have already painted which means more coats. worst case you may even be removing that coat before priming.
primer is almost guaranteed to cut the number of coats. if you put one coat of paint on and thats it, its gonna look like hell in a year.
so in the words of clint eastwood: tell me punk, do you feel lucky? <g>
randy

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Not lucky, just confused. If it is painted it doesn't require primer. It's a year since I painted the interior of my house with one coat. Don't see anything looking like hell. Of course I washed all surfaces with about 1/4 cup of TSP per 2 gallons of water and contrary to another post it doesn't show any streaks either. If you are smart you always clean the surface before painting.
xrongor wrote:

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hey, you like to gamble, dont use primer. primer isnt paint and paint isnt primer. they serve two seperate functions.
randy

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And primer is a total waste of time in this case.
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wrote:

So, randy what primer would you recommend for this job??
Classic case of why top posting sucks so I'll jump all over to respond.

Absurd.
So randy what primer would you recommend for this job?

covering up whatever you don't want to get paint on.
If it isn't filthy or greasy don't wash it. knock the dust & cobwebs off & paint it. If, once it's dry if you feel you need another coat it will only take a short time to do it.
Spend a few extra bucks on a lambswoll roller you'll be glad you did.
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wheres waldo

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wrote:

Huh? Can you answer the question?
So, randy what primer would you recommend for this job??

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You got the first part right about washing with STP. The answer is no. Two coats of the new paint will cover better than 1 coat of prime and 1 coat final paint. If you prime, you might be painting it 3 times.
Mick wrote:

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No - that's just another coat. By a good, high solids paint and you will only need 1 coat. Sherwin Williams SuperPaint - there are others.
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(with possible editing):

Put me down with those that tell you not to prime. More important: look at the formulas on the cans first. Ceiling paint and primer are almost identical. "Premium" ceiling paint usually contains a little more solids (usually titanium dioxide), while "primer" contains a little more binder. Normally, if you remove any surface dust or cobwebs, a single coat of a premium ceiling paint is all you need.
--
Larry
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Primer is only for bare surfaces, once something has been painted you can use regular paint in the future.
If the ceiling is not too dirty you don't need to do much cleaning. Just check for cobwebs that sometimes go overlooked.
If the ceiling is in a bathroom or kitchen I prefer to use a semi-gloss which makes it easier to clean. (In a bathroom a paint formulated to retard mildew growth is best.) Otherwise, a flat white is normally the choice.
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I had a white, textured ceiling that showed graying around the air vents from a burnt out furnace jacket. I repainted it the same white using a deep pile sheepskin roller and the cheapest white paint I could find. It soaked it up like mad -- glad I used cheap paint. Twenty years later, it still looks good.
SJF
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