ceiling fans

Hi...
My wife wants to put a ceiling fan up in an area with a high ceiling. What's the longest practical hang you can get with a ceiling fan? Obviously, the shorter the hang is the more stable the fan is, but we've got a long distance to cover. This is one of those 2-story openings from the upper floor; would it be a good idea to install a brace at the 2nd floor opening?
Thanks -Mark
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The better balanced the fan is, the longer you can go without wobble. My personal choice is Casablanca "Panama" with "Intellitouch" control. I don't think you can get a smoother running fan

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On Mon, 26 Jun 2006 18:38:21 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Forget the fan, buy a tethered remote-control helicopter.
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They make down rods up to ten feet

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Mark Modrall wrote:

As said earlier, the key is making sure the blades are balanced. And purchase a nice quality fan.
JD
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Mark Modrall wrote:

BTDT about 3 months ago. Family room ceiling ~18ft. Don't remember the the manufacturer, might have been Casablanca. 60" fan, 6 blades, remote with dimmers. Used 8' downrod, about 1' from top of fan mount to bottom of light kit, puts it about 9' above the floor. Must be pretty well balanced, not a hint of wobble, even on high speed. Never weighed it, but a good-sized fan and an 8' downrod isn't light, you want to make sure that electrical box is going to take the weight. Our builder had placed the ceiling electrical box directly on a stud, didn't look like it needed any reinforcement. Box was prewired to 2 wall switches, one for fan, one for light, but only used 1 switch because fan came with remote.
Worst part was hanging the sucker. Rented two 6' sections of scaffolding, didn't care too much for standing with my feet 12' above the floor on a wobbly scaffold. Wouldn't have done it at all if the scaffold did not have a safety railing - me and heights are not very good friends. I think I'll confine all my future ceiling fan work to single-story.
Jerry
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Mark Modrall wrote:

http://bigassfans.com/catalogue/default.asp
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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Oh pshaw, on Mon 26 Jun 2006 03:29:20p, Mark Modrall meant to say...

A lot depends on the specific fan and how stable and wobble-free it is on its own. One of the most stable is the Hunter Original. The motor housing is made of cast iron and the fan weighs in at nearly 50 pounds. It is inherently wobble-free if the blades are properly balanced, and they usually are.
In a previous house we had fans installed in a 2-story space. I mounted them with the fan itself at 9-10 feet above the floor. Nary a problem.
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