Ceiling Fans

Hi, looking for some advice here. I would like to replace my ceiling light fixture with a ceiling fan w/light. Is there anything I should be aware of as far as power is concerned? Will I need to upgrade my electrical since I'm replacing lights with two motors? I don't want to keep resetting my circuit breakers. I don't know much about electrical systems so any advice would be helpful. I think the fans would both be on a 20 amp circuit. Thanks.
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Hi, looking for some advice here. I would like to replace my ceiling light fixture with a ceiling fan w/light. Is there anything I should be aware of as far as power is concerned? Will I need to upgrade my electrical since I'm replacing lights with two motors? I don't want to keep resetting my circuit breakers. I don't know much about electrical systems so any advice would be helpful. I think the fans would both be on a 20 amp circuit. Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If your light is on a switch, you can cut the switch off to kill power to the 120 volt circuit, however, keep in mind that many ceiling boxes are also junction boxes and have other live circuits in them that go to other places. If you are not experienced in electrical methods, it would be better and safer for you to cut off the main power switch to do the wiring, since some ceiling boxes have a number of wires in tight proximity. You do not want to be tugging and pulling on live circuits, unless you are an electrician. Do it during the day, so you can have light from a window. Also, keep in mind that you must adequately support a ceiling fan, since it weighs more than a light fixture, normally. A normal light support is designed to support approx. 12 lbs, if installed properly. Remember the fan also has vibration and movement so all the locking parts must be installed properly to make it safe from falling. You will not normally ever have to upgrade electrical circuits for ceiling fans, since they do not pull many amps. If you have a number of them on a single circuit along with other motors and it over amps your circuit breaker will trip. Only then would I worry about upgrading. You probably are ok there. If you are not an extremely handy person, I would recommend someone who installs fans for a living to do it so that your family will have the maximum safety. Doing it yourself is good for some jobs, but, unless you are fairly knowledgable about ceiling fan installation, I would recommend an expert. It may cost you a whole lot less in the long run. I hope this helps.
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Couple of issues in doing this. Currently, there is only one wire from your switch feeding the ceiling box, so unless you get a fan with electronic controls,or remote controls, you'll have to use the wall switch and pull chains to control fan and lights separately. The ceiling box is not made for fan support, so it'll have to be replaced with one that is. I'd also recommend any fan brand but "Hunter" as they tend to be real heavy, and many need additional support. The existing power to the box should be sufficient.

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Lighting circuits can be 15 amp. Where I live they are 15 amp almost exclusively.
I have never seen a ceiling fan with 2 motors. Or do you mean 2 fans with one motor each? Unless your using something out of the ordinary the motors should pose no problem.
HOWEVER, the support of the fan might be a issue. There are special fan boxes, with 10-24 screws that are attached to the structure. Hanging a fan from a regular box is just asking for trouble. Home stores have several kinds available.
Check to see how the boxes are supported, before you buy anything.
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thanks everyone for their replies. I think I got the answer I was looking for. Basically I will not have to worry about tripping my circuit breaker. I will most likely use some kind of fan brace that they sell at home depot.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The advice about there only being a single circuit going to the light is a good one. One solution would be to use the wireless remotes that are available. You could remove/bypass the existing switch, then use the remote to control the fan/lights. If you want the lights to still be controlled by the wall switch, then things get more complicated. You'd have to get a new hot wire run to the fans. If there is attic above, that could be fairly easy. If not, it's a real pain. You could then use a wireless for the fan and the wall switch for the lights.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Two bits of advice: (1) don't buy a Hampton Bay fan (Home Depot's private label) as they tend to be noisy fans - humming from the fan motors, particularly at low speeds. It's worth the extra dollars in lifespan and quietness to buy Hunter, particularly for bedrooms. (2) if you get the heavy Hunter, make sure you get the highest quality box and brace. HD and Lowe's sell DIY electric box kits that MIGHT do the job. But if you have access to the ceiling joists, you're better off putting in 2x4 braces and attaching the electrical box to them. It might even be worth the effort to cut into the ceiling, if you're a bit adventurous and the ceiling already needs painting...
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