Ceiling fan in winter...is it worth it?

Is it worth while to run my living room ceiling fan during the winter? I do have it on reverse (i.e. sucking air up toward the fan) but wonder if the cost of electricity offsets the furnace cost. I don't notice a difference in my heat pump cycles because, by nature, they run all the time regardless (not including AUX heat).
BTW- my living room is 14'x20' and the ceiling is 9 feet high.
TIA.
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Scall5
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Scall5 wrote:

You should notice that the air is better mixed, and therefore the room is warmer at the lower level (where you live, not the ceiling) at the same thermostat setting. Stick a couple of thermometers in different locations/heights in the room and see how the fan affects the temperatures with the fan off and on. It most likely won't be a huge difference, but a couple of degrees difference can make quite a difference in comfort.
R
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Good idea! Thanks for the feedback.
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Scall5
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You can get the same effect by putting your thermostat fan switch to 'on'. As long as the house is tight, and the duct work is sized properly, you should see a more even temp. Make sure your humidity level is high enough, and you can probably turn the thermostat temp down a few degrees.

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Won't that make the edges of the room warmer and bring the somewhat colder air from the edges to the middle? Isn't it more effective to go in forward in the winter?
And I agree with Bob about the humidity.

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wrote:

Some people can't tell which direction is better. A difference which makes no difference, is no difference.

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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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My own experience was that the increased air flow made me feel cooler. In a static environment you don't have the "wind chill" factor. In addition you may find an increase in dirt on the ceiling because of that upward air flow. I don't bother with reversing.
Charlie

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Personal experience: At home it makes no difference with the central baseboard heat. With the woodstove, it evens out the temperatures and help move the air to other parts of the house.
At work, we have 20' ceilings in the shop. It can bring up the temperature at floor level by 10 degrees, but this is with a lot of machines running that use steam . With no machines, it makes little difference, but it does circulated the warmer air that would tend to be at the top. Maybe a couple of degrees.
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