Cavity wall - filled with water?

Hi there, hope you can help. I ma having building works done at th moment. side extension and dormer loft conversion at the same time.
On Friday gone there was a heavy downpour and the felt at the back o the house was not long enough to reach the gutter and...we were woke at 7.30am to a flood of water coming into our bedroom from around th top of the window the soffits are joined to the window frame.
It also 'ran down' and started coming in through the 'window frame' o the room directly below. There were also trickles coming down one sid of the dining room about 8ft in.
The builder says he doesn't want to 'waste time' going through th insurers because of loss adjusters taking time etc etc and will fix an problems.
I have 2 questions.
1) Could the water have penetrated the gap in the cavity wall?
2) If so I appreciate that there are problems that I wouldn't se fo now what should I do?
3) The carpet in the bedroom is still soaking and starting to smel mouldy, he has suggested getting a professional carpet cleaning compan - a mate I am sure :-) . Will this allow the floorboards to dry ou sufficiently?
Hope someone can offer some advice.
Thanks
De
-- drobbrown
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drobbrown wrote:

Personally, I think you are in for a very difficult time.
While it may be true that a single water damage incident will dry out eventually and not leave mold growing, you don't know that for sure in any given incident.
If water did get into the stud wall cavity (and I think it likely), there could be a very long time period before this dries out and mold colonies could be forming which may blossom every time there is a rise in humidity.
Flooring is a special problem in itself. If the floor really is "boards" these may dry without mold growing. Of course, they may also warp.
If the floor is particle board or plywood, there could be a real mold problem plus delamination.
The carpet at least can be cleaned or in the worst case replaced.
What I fear most is that you won't know about some of these developments until long after the tradesman has departed the county. Then what?
You may want to enlist the aid of a lawyer *right now* to ensure that your rights are protected.
A few links which may be of some general interest: http://www.floodwaterdamage.com/aspergillus_mould.htm http://www.moldcheck.com/MoldCleanUp.asp http://www.molddamagecontrol.com/list.htm http://www.moldinspector.com/mold_removal.htm
BTW, if you are in UK, suggest posting to this newsgroup: UK.D-I-Y
Jim
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Dee,
In your phone book you will find water restoration companies that specialize in cleaning up water damage. Once you've consulted with a few and chosen one ask the contractor how he wishes to pay them. As the contractor he is responsible for clean up but he does not get to dictate what he will pay for or who he will pay.
Good luck, Dave M.
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