caulking around toilet

Seemed like an easy thing but getting a bead that looks decent isn't that easy. Any suggestions?
The tile behind the toilet is coming up and looks like it has been water damaged. Is there a good way to glue the linoleum, not tile, down?
Thanks : -)
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The caulk part is easy. Use DAP or other water based caulk. Apply caulk to clean, dry surfaces. It is better practice to not caulk the back side. Use a medium sized bead. If you have too much it does not hurt, just harder to clean up and wastes the material, but better too much than too little.. Completely wet a large soft sponge. While the caulk is fresh before it develops a film, wipe as much caulk off as you can. Continue wiping, rinsing, sponging until you have the results you are after. Make sure the caulk is completely removed from the floor and the shiny part of the vitreous leaving only the caulk bead, any film left will look tacky. Same method for setting self rimming sinks and similar items. This allows water out to warn you of a failed wax ring.
For the sheet flooring, spray adhesive is fast and easy. Make sure to remove overspray with a touch of mineral spirits (easy while it is fresh). I assume you are talking about a limited area.
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Some plumbers will tell you to use unsanded, white grout, instead of caulk, around a toilet. The caulk can pull the flooring up if you have to remove the toilet. Grout won't do that.
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On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 15:19:25 -0500, "Buck Turgidson"

You really should keep you caulk IN the toilet, or you will pee on the floor :)
I worked as a plumber for many years. I never had a problem with flooring coming up when I had to do a toilet removal. (unless the flooring was already loose). I just used the plain white tub caulk and worked it smooth with a wet rag.
As for loose linoleum, aside from ripping things up, toilet removal, etc. The only solution is to get a heavy animal syringe, poke holes in the linolum with an awl, and shoot the adhesive underneath with the syringe. Then press down firmly and apply weights (bricks), for several days. Be sure to put a little caulk into the awl holes when you remove the bricks. It's not a perfect solution, but can extend the life of the floor for a few more years. (Be sure the syringe has a thick needle or you will never get the paste to go thru).
Mark
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Grout also isn't flexible, and will surely crack.
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If you caulk around it, there wont be any place for the pee to go.
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I use white silicone caulk vs painters' caulk, as it is waterproof yet flexible, and a very effective adhesive. Leave the back side of the base of the toilet open. That way, if there is a seal leak, you will find it, rather than have the leakage seep down through the floor.
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Roger T. wrote:

paris provides rock-solid support for the toilet at its edge on the floor. Caulk has no part of it.
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The toilet is not meant to be supported by grout. It is meant to be supported by the center, and by the contact of the toilet itself to the floor, or shims if necessary.
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On the other hand, sealing all the way around prevents any water (say from the shower, toilet overflow, whatever) from getting IN. If your wax seal is good, you should never have a leak inside your toilet. The same can't be said for your bathroom floor in general.
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