Caulk: What Type To Use ?

Hi,
Never sure what the best, or most appropriate type of caulk to use.
Have about a two foot long x perhaps 1/16" thich horizontal crack that developed in the garage plasterboard (or should I call it drywall ?) wall. Some spots perhaps an 1/8 gap It's a roughened surface.
Just for info., the garage is under the house, and this is the interior wall.
What should I use:
- pure RTV Silicone
- acrylic latex - RTV blend
- acrylic latex
Or,... ?
Why ?
Would anything prevent it from opening further, or again, or should I just consider it as a temporary fix ? I guess a flesible type of sealant might be good as it wouild expand and contract a bit with the gap ?
Any thoughts on this would be most appreciated.
Thanks, bob
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Robert11 wrote:

Caulk will not work - any caulk. What's it supposed to stick to? The edge of the paper? The gypsum itself? Too chalky. Tape and spackle is the way to patch drywall. You could pop for some Krack Kote or something like that, but the regular tape and joint compound will be fine.
R
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: Hi, : : Never sure what the best, or most appropriate type of caulk to use. : : Have about a two foot long x perhaps 1/16" thich horizontal crack that : developed in the : garage plasterboard (or should I call it drywall ?) wall. Some spots : perhaps an 1/8 gap : It's a roughened surface.
===> If you need to paint it, check the instructions for paintability; it's written right on the tube. Acrylix latex is paintable, GE Silicone II isn't, and others depend. If you won't be painting, the silicone is the best in my opinion.
: : Just for info., the garage is under the house, and this is the interior : wall. : : What should I use: : : - pure RTV Silicone : : - acrylic latex - RTV blend : : - acrylic latex : : Or,... ? : : Why ? : : Would anything prevent it from opening further, or again, or should I just : consider it : as a temporary fix ? I guess a flesible type of sealant might be good as it : wouild expand and : contract a bit with the gap ?
===> Yup, as I said, GE Silicone II would be great for that as long as you don't want to paint it, and prepare the area before you caulk. I think if it were me, and I've done this, I'd use the Painter's Acrylic Latex stuff though. For one thing, it would show later on without a doubt if the gap opens more and make it easy to determine later on if something were wrong with that wall and maybe needed to be looked into. It's probably just minor stuff, but ... best to be sure. Or, you could mud, tape and mud it, then sand it out, if it's a wall that matters for its esthetics. That's the usual way to fix something like that, but takes a little more work and time.
HTH,
Pop
: : Any thoughts on this would be most appreciated. : : Thanks, : bob : : : :
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I have successfully used caulk. The hard part is that it doesn't sand well like spackling. It takes several iterations and use a sharp blade to slice off the excess carefully and it looks OK. Other than that it works fine. I have a spot where I have plaster which I think was put on a heating duct. If I just use spackling it will crack again the next day, and get progressively worse.
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