Caulk tub

I want to caulk the space between the fiberglass tub and the sheetrock. One side has about a 1/8 inch gap while another side is about 1/4 inch.
I don't want a 1/4 inch of caulking on both sides. I will be using 100 % silicone.
All I can think about is fill in the gap with a thin piece of sheetrock. Anything easier ?
Thanks, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

sheetrock.
Folded newspaper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy wrote:

Backer rod.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/7/2012 3:02 PM, dadiOH wrote: ...

+1
--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, November 7, 2012 3:02:36 PM UTC-6, dadiOH wrote:

Thanks, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
'Andy[_17_ Wrote: > ;2957027']I want to caulk the space between the fiberglass tub and the > sheetrock.

> sheetrock.

Andy:
I've done more than my fair share of wall tiling around tubs, and you'd probably be better off taking that drywall down and using a proper tile backer board like Hardibacker, Wonderboard or Denshield instead.
The reason I'd be reluctant to caulk the gap between your tile backer and the tub is that you have a fiberglass tub, which isn't nearly as durable as an enameled steel tub. So, in future, if you ever have to redo the tiling around your tub, you'll have the problem of removing any caulk you put in there, and that's likely gonna be hard to do without damaging the finish on the tub. You don't really need to caulk that gap either. If your bottom row of tiles hangs down in front of that gap, and you caulk the joint between the tiles and the tub, water's not gonna get into that gap.
But, if it were me, and I was dead set on filling the gap between the tub and tile backer, I'd put masking tape all over the tub and bottom of the tile backer and then fill that gap with expanding foam. Once that foam is cured, you can cut it off flush with the tile backer using a razor knife.
Personally, I think it's better not even to fill that gap. I've tiled all 21 bathrooms in my apartment block and none of them had that gap filled with anything. Most of them were done 15 to 20 years ago, and so if there was a problem associated with not filling that gap, I woulda seen that problem by now. So far there hasn't been any problem at all doing it that way.
Is this your first wall tiling job?
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, November 7, 2012 5:03:36 PM UTC-6, nestork wrote:

Thanks.
The tub is next to painted sheetrock. Only tile is on the floor.
My daughter asked me about a 1 inch hole in some floor tile. She is worried it will get bigger.
She has more tile, but it sounds like a major project taking out a piece unless you had a water saw.
Looking for ideas on that.
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have you seen the "hole"? How old is the tile?
Seems to me that you don't typically get a 1" hole in tile, unless perhaps a corner of a tile has cracked off or she has very small tiles and an entire 1" x 1" tile popped out.
I can tell you from experience that once the tiny tiles start poping off of their mortar bed (assuming that's what she has) it might be the first sign of a bigger problem. If the mortar bed is deteriorating, then more and more tile will keep popping off. You either have to remove tile back to solid mortar - without disturbing the solid mortar - then fill the area in with plywood and backer board and then put the tile back on, or do as I did: bite the bullet and take out all of the old mortar and retile the entire floor with more modern materials.
If it's a cracked corner off of a larger tile, you should be able to remove the rest of the tile and relplace it, assuming you can find something that matches.
More info about the type of tile and the type of "hole" would help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 9, 2012 1:11:58 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The tile with the hole is about 16"x16" and there are no problems with any other tile. There is a pool table close by, someone may have dropped a leg down on that one tile to make the hole. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy wrote:

It won't get bigger by itself. ______________

1. Hit tile with hammer. If it doesn't break, hit until it does.
2. Once broken, chisel/pry out the pieces. A cold chisel will work, so will a screw driver, big wide one preferred.
3. Once tile is out, clean out whatever was holding it there. It may be thinset (cementatious) or an organic mastic. A wood chisel will work for mastic, the cold chisel and/or hammer will do thinset.
4. Put in a new tile.
5. Wait a couple of days.
6. Grout new tile. I trust you have or can obtain grout of the correct color.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't want 100% silicone. It should be anti mold silicone.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, November 9, 2012 5:38:10 PM UTC-6, Gz wrote:

The caulk is G.E. Premium waterproof silcone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Nov 2012 08:57:31 -0800 (PST), Andy

Pretty sure that's what I've used more than once for tubs. I didn't read this except the OP, so this might be worthless. A 1/8 inch gap is nothing to fill. Run the gun along it and fill it flush. Then cut the nozzle bigger for the finish bead. Go big with the bead, not small. Wet you forming tool for the finish. My favorite is a 3/8" wood chisel. Whatever works. After forming the bead, leave the excess alone for a couple hours. Then look closely for any place the excess wasn't cleanly cut from the bead. Razor that and just peel the excess off. Done. Another way that works for small beads of white-on-white is just use your wettened finger. Different "blended" look, but it might work for you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.