cat urine under deck

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Anyone have experience removing the strong stench of cat urine from under a deck?
I've noticed stray cats in our yard the last couple of months and hadn't thought much of it. They were passing through, no big deal. Big mistake. Recently, our house started reeking of cat urine. Turns out we've been having a couple of these cats staying under the deck and it smells like a litter box. Very bad. Knock you on your ass bad. They must have pissed all over the house, marking territory, because it reeks inside the house too. Back door and front door. And this is winter with the doors closed up tight! Incredible.
Right now there's snow banks out there but I was hoping I could douse the area with chemicals because I'm sure the smell is only going to get worse when Spring hits. Anyone run into a chemical solution that worked effectively (heard this is one of the worse smells to try to get rid of).
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I've had great luck getting rid of dead rodent odor using this stuff:
http://www.petco.com/Shop/Product.aspx?R 83&Nav=1&N=0&Ntt=animal+odor&skub6058&familyID376
I have no idea how well it would work in your situation, but it claims to work outside.
Good luck.
H

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wrote:

we like this one:at www.grainger.com buy the gallons of concentrate 3UR39 Deodorant, Size 1 Gallon, Cherry/Almond, Concentrate 1:64, Enzyme RAMSEY KIL-ODER CHERRY/ALMOND     1     Today         $26.90     1170
on a concrete surface, the cheapest solution a quart of laundry bleach in a gallon garden sprayer, fill with water; but there are inhaling hazards, wind blows it around, and issues with damaging/discoloring your wood deck; vegetation, pet paws, and work clothes hazards.
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wrote:

Perhaps you might consider a cage trap. If these are indeed "stray" cats, then they can be returned to their owners with a request that they be confined. (Either the cats or the owners as you prefer :) )
If these are feral cats, then they should be delivered to the nearest animal shelter for humane disposal.
It's worked for me.
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and the supply is basically endless. In this weather, if you can rig up a freeze-proof hose, and soak it a couple of times, it'll learn not to hang around.
aem sends...
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responsibility for spay & neuter. Much more education is required, and even so, there will always be selfish people, alas.
Meantime, you might call your local shelter and see if they will give/rent you a humane trap, or even bring one out. It couldn't hurt to ask. By continuing to let the feral cats breed, you multiply the problem geometrically.
Aspasia
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<aspasia> wrote in message

Absent that, nature abhors a vacum, and the only population control is carrying capacity of the area. Humane trap is meaningless if the shelter just puts them down anyway. It's like sweeping a beach- no matter how many you cart off, there will always be more.
aem sends...
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them down as humanely as possible.
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Not so pointless. Last time we were infested (about 5 years ago), we disposed of nine. Now it's only the neighbourhood pets that are around, but I like the water idea for them......
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Get rid of the strays first, then worry about the smell.
I think the smell issue will take care of itself pretty quickly after the strays are gone.
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Dan Espen wrote:

If they can't access the area they will go elsewhere. Hardware cloth may be a good choice.

I agree.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
  Click to see the full signature.
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Get yourself a good .22 rifle and start dropping the sonsabitches. A Marlin 60 or 10/22 Ruger would be perfect. Then figure out what to do about the stench.
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won't cycle in a semi auto........
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In that case, a Lever-Action .22 would be best. They cycle .22 short, long, and long rifle equally well. .22 shorts are best if you don't want to start a ruckus.

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Alright, thanks guys.
I'm going to run out this afternoon and see if I can find one of the solutions mentioned above. In the meantime, I've boarded up any crevice or hole that would allow a cat to crawl under. Still have to figure out what to do about the cats. Yesturday, I was chasing one through backyards with a shovel. I'm much faster than I thought because I keapt up pretty well, which was amazing considering I was wearing big boots and the snow was shin deep. But when all was said and done it wasn't an effective way to deal with the problem, and an even worse way to meet the neighbors. As for shooting, I'm not sure about the local police department's position on discharing firearms in town. On the plus side, I haven't seen the cats prowling around yet today so maybe the shovel did the trick after all. Probably not.
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J.A. Michel wrote:

About three years ago, a Michigan state legislator proposed a bill for an "open hunting season" on feral cats.
About the same time, the NRA had its annual convention in Houston. Appearing at the convention's Glock booth was R. Lee Emery of "Full Metal Jacket" fame. ( http://www.rleeermey.com/ )
I mentioned the proposed legislation to Lee then told him I was putting together a Celebrity Cat-Call tape. Would he be interested in saying the line: "Here, kitty-kitty" for the tape?
He looked up from his autographing, stared at me for a moment, and said: "That is the most fucked-up idea I have EVER heard."
Oh well.
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On 17 Feb 2007 20:57:13 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

I had the same question, my friend told me the smell will not ever goaway if cats keep urinating there. You need to discourage them from returning. I used mothballs under the deck.
Once I was able to reduce the visits from the cats, it seems that nature makes its own cleaner. Bateria, rain, sun, etc, seemed to get rid of the urine smell quickly for me.
The only perm solution for me, seems to get rid of the cats.
tom @ www.YourMoneyMakingIdeas.com
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On 17 Feb 2007 20:57:13 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

If you can't eliminate the cats put something under the deck area that cats don't like. For example, they don't like stepping on chicken wire. Also they don't like the herb rue. After the cats are gone, the smell will go away. You can spread some agricultural lime over the area to help.
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This is exactly how we used to deal with this when I was a kid. It worked quite well. Every once in a while a "stray" or feral would try to move under our front porch in town -- that always meant there was a hole someplace. Remember, cats are very slick -- like mice, they can get into a very small space. Once we'd find the hole, we'd take advantage of being filthy dirty and under the porch to clean out a bit, put down lime, etc. Then patch up.
Phisherman is right -- cats hate walking on chicken wire. In fact, you can put it over the top of the dirt on house plants if you have a digger.
Another odor fighter is Nature's Miracle -- you can buy it by the gallon and spray it all over the door, deck, etc... http://www.jbpet.com/Shopping/category.asp?catalog_name=JBWholesale&category_name=SanitationStain&page=1 has listings including major spray systems for it. And, once that's done, and you've kitty-proofed the place, time will take away the smell. I bought my house from a cat person -- I don't mean a crazy cat lady or anything, but she did feed neighborhood cats and let them in the yard. My three dogs took care of that in short order -- and about six months later any remnant of cat odor was completely gone.
Of course, now the mice have figured out it's a dog house, not a cat house.
Can't win.
--svs
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On 19 Feb 2007 06:45:03 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"
[...]

[...]
Tried it on my veg garden. Didn't work.
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