Cat urine smell

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Doesnt a floating floor still contact the floor underneath?
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On Thursday, May 2, 2013 1:00:44 PM UTC-4, chaniarts wrote:

What kind do you have? I have three different black lights, and none of them do much for my dog's urine.
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On 5/9/2013 5:53 AM, TimR wrote:

haven't a clue. cheap ebay from china probably. it uses a few uv leds with a ring of white leds around that, and a red laser pointer in the center with a 3 position switch.
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To verify that the uv light actually works, try looking at a credit-card with it.
And, for a complete gross-out, clean your bathroom walls, mirror, etc as much as you can, then turn off the lights and turn on the uv-light.
If it works, you will be totally grossed out.
David
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On 5/1/2013 11:06 PM, Chris wrote:

agency and child support.. he bolted out with no notice.. the smell is concentrated in the front room of the basement. its dark, and thats were we think the cat was going to town. He was always hanging out in the window of that room, and there is a ton of hair in that area..

As you probably know, you really have to find "ground zero". Nature's Miracle works very well but it has to be on the exact spot. We have a stupid cat that "likes" to anoint certain things. Look for plastic things like grocery bags, etc. Also, rubber that is smelly. BTW, a 6 month old kitten is already a (stupid) cat.
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Vinegar, clorox, oxiclean, ozone. It may be under or in the tiles. Wet the whole floor and baseboards.
Odoban will not neutralize cat urine.
Greg
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Soak the floor so whatever you use sinks into all the cracks between the tiles and actually gets under them. You may have to refloor with a seamless material over the tile, or maybe put down a vapor barrier underneath carpeting.
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....as will a .22 to the head.
nb
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ybe the last 6 months of his occupancy. The basement totally reeks of cat p iss.. we went over the basement with a black light to no avail. we saw mayb e 1 or 2 suspicious areas. We mopped with Odoban twice. Sprayed Natures Mir acle 3 times.. The smell is less than it was, but it is still there.. most of the basement is linoleum tile, and one small area is bare concrete. But, we can not find the definitive area(s) with the blacklight.. (Unlike the h ouse we live in.. so it's not like we blind or something)  There was urin e soaked card board boxes when he left, but they have been removed out of t he basement for weeks.

st pouring straight on the floor and scrubbing it in and covering with plas tic to keep it working for a day..
its impossible to remove urine odor. or heavy smoke odors from a fire. or odors of something that died.
what you must do is remove any soft items like carpet etc.
remove and toss the floor tile.... it absorbs bad odors
paint all the walls cielings etc with kilz or bin oil base. then topcoat with whatever paint you care to use
seal all concrete with outdoor polyurethane, give it 2 or better yet 3 coats
what you do is seal the odor in since its impossible to remove it all.
I ha a home that stank bad, after this procedure which is what fire restoration companies do, its the ONLY REAL FIX!!
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maybe the last 6 months of his occupancy. The basement totally reeks of cat piss.. we went over the basement with a black light to no avail. we saw ma ybe 1 or 2 suspicious areas. We mopped with Odoban twice. Sprayed Natures M iracle 3 times.. The smell is less than it was, but it is still there.. mos t of the basement is linoleum tile, and one small area is bare concrete. Bu t, we can not find the definitive area(s) with the blacklight.. (Unlike the house we live in.. so it's not like we blind or something)  There was ur ine soaked card board boxes when he left, but they have been removed out of the basement for weeks.

just pouring straight on the floor and scrubbing it in and covering with pl astic to keep it working for a day..

Yes, do the above. You might also consider steam cleaning the floor when you have taken up the coverings.
Catpiss was designed by nature to have a lingering smell. Works well don't it?:-)
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wrote:

the last 6 months of his occupancy. The basement totally reeks of cat piss.. we went over the basement with a black light to no avail. we saw maybe 1 or 2 suspicious areas. We mopped with Odoban twice. Sprayed Natures Miracle 3 times.. The smell is less than it was, but it is still there.. most of the basement is linoleum tile, and one small area is bare concrete. But, we can not find the definitive area(s) with the blacklight.. (Unlike the house we live in.. so it's not like we blind or something)  There was urine soaked card board boxes when he left, but they have been removed out of the basement for weeks.

pouring straight on the floor and scrubbing it in and covering with plastic to keep it working for a day..

My son details cars at a dealership. The get some real interesting cars on trade.
They've killed cigarette, rotten cheese, dead critter, and pet urine odors with an overnight [or two] of ozone. They just turn a 'New Living Alpine Air' ozone generator on high and shut it up in the car for a day or two. [there may be others that work as well-- I just know that *this* one works]
We had a mattress fire in the house and an overnight in a bedroom 'cured' the nasty odor that generated.
There are health concerns about occupying a room where it is running- so read up on it.
Jim
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Interesting. Perhaps one can rent an air purifier. Here's another thing you might read up on:
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/health/ecoquest.html
nb
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From there- "a federal judge had ordered Alpine to stop claiming that its machines provide relief from any medical condition or that they effectively remove or reduce a wide variety of air pollutants from indoor environments. "
I've bought a couple on Ebay and though I don't expect any health benefits-- and don't know *how* they work--- I can say for certain that they eliminate a wide variety of odors, and I've never noticed any harm to rubber, paint, or fabrics in the rooms where I've used them.
They might leave the 'pollutants' that cause the odors, but they take their smell away, which works for me.<g>
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht;3056640 Wrote: > '98 Complaints and Reviews about Ecoquest & Alpine Air' > (http://www.consumeraffairs.com/health/ecoquest.html )[/i][/color]

Being a landlord of a small apartment block, I spend more time at my local Janitorial Supply store than most people.
An ozone generator is the biggest gun in the arsenal when it comes to eliminating odors. When a person who lives alone dies in their house, and the body isn't discovered until the neighbors start to complain about the horrible smell coming from the house, it's an ozone generator (or several of them) that are used to eliminate the smell before the house is put up for sale (if that's what the will states or beneficiaries of the will want.
Ozone generators can be rented from many of the places listed under "Janitorial Equipment & Supplies" in your yellow pages. It is unhealthy to breathe ozone in, so it's best to leave the room immediately after starting the ozone generator, and not to enter the room for several hours after the ozone generator stops. Often they will have built in timers, but you can also simply use an extension cord run under the room door to plug them in and unplug them as necessary.
Ozone is O3, or a three atom oxygen molecule. Ozone is an "oxidizing bleach" because it works exactly the same way as other oxidizing bleaches like sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and hydrogen peroxide (HOOH). That is, they all spontaneously break down to form more stable molecules, O2, NaCl and H2O, releasing a lone oxygen atom as they do. Lone oxygen atoms are extremely reactive, and tend to react with large organic molecules which are inherantly unstable and will break down on their own given sufficient time (like DNA). Large organic molecules are often the source of colours, smells and undoubtedly, tastes. The oxygen atom eliminates the colour, smell or taste by reacting at various sites on the large organic molecule and thereby breaking it into pieces. The pieces of the molecules are still present, but since none of them absorb certain wavelengths of light or affect the olefactory sensors in our noses or tastebuds on our tongues the same way as the original molecule did, the colour, smell and taste seem to disappear as those large organic molecules are broken into pieces.
So, when you bleach the colour out of a cotton T-shirt, it's more correct to say that you destroyed the dye molecules on it than to say that you removed the dye. The pieces of dye molecule are still on the cotton, but they're in pieces which don't absorb any wavelength of light in the visible range, so the cotton looks the same as it would if those pieces weren't there. Similarily, ozone destroys the molecules in the air that cause smells, and the organic substances that produce those molecules.
But, ozone will work on ALL large inherently unstable organic molecules. So, if you have dyed carpeting on the floor, dyed upholstery on your couch, dyed fabric on your curtains, the ozone will lighten those as well as it breaks down some of the dye molecules on each. PAINTS use pigments instead of dyes, and some of those pigments are large organic molecules whereas others are inorganic, and best described as coloured rocks that have been pulverized into a very fine powder. The organic pigments may be damaged by ozone, whereas the pulverized rocks won't be affected by it. So, whether ozone affects your paint colour depends largely on what colour your wall paint is.
Undoubtedly, the reason why this ozone generator company was told to stop advertising that their ozone generators relieve any medical conditions is that people will breathe in that ozone hoping to cure themselves of it, and the ozone will attack the tissues in their nose, throat and lungs as well as irritate their skin.
--
nestork


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Chris wrote:

Rent an ozone generator for a day. Smell will disappear, as well as roaches, small mammals, some paint.
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Isin't it too bad that you now have to spend hundreds of dollars and a lot of time and effort to get rid of the smell, when for only $100 (at most) the cat (probably male) could have been neutered and the urine smell would have been drastically reduced...
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all of these issues are why no pets is often in the lease......
pets are fine but can do lots of damage to your property.....
Again you CANT clean the odors out what you do is seal them in. this is how pros mitigate odors.
while ou might temporarily get rid of the stink, in awhile theres moist weather and it returns:(
Its far easier to solve the problem permanetely than doing a halfway fix and have the new tenant complain because the odor returned and have to work around all their possesions:(
I had a rental property my rule was no pets and no smoking. When the elderly lady who rented got ill I did let her keep her daughters dog there for company. the tenant was awesome and i was very sad when she died.
so exceptions can be made.
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bob haller wrote:

Your reply did not address the point I was making..................
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I agree getting the cat fixed will help but not necessarily prevent the problem entirely:(
We have a male dog named Jack who got fixed by 6 months old, and he is marking stuff...:(
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On 5/2/2013 5:23 AM, Home Guy wrote:

because your point is incorrect. neutering can stop marking, but it isn't 100% effective. i work in a pet shelter, all males are neutered on entrance, and i can tell you for sure they still mark, along with some females.
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