cat pee removal

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My cat did the nasty on a fabric padded stool (foam underneath the fabric). What can remove the smell? Tried carpet freshener, which didn't seem to have any effect.
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Jedd Haas - Artist
http://www.gallerytungsten.com
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Jedd Haas wrote:

Remove and discard the fabric and foam. If the pee got through to any wooden surfaces under the fabric, clean and then coat them with varnish. Then install new foam and fabric.
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Go to a janitorial supply store and buy a malodorant (Available in several different brands). Apply the malodorant libberally <AND THEN APPLY MORE.> Let dry. If it still smells repeat the process untill you are satisfied. The malodorant will eat the enzymes that cause the smell. It does not "mask" them like carpet fresheners try to do and fail. It's also much more pleasant to work with than varnish or shellac.
Malodorants are also available at pet stores but are double and quadruple the price of the janitorail suppliers. The key is applying the stuff libberally. (YOU CAN'T APPLY TOO MUCH).
Good luck,
Craig in AZ
www.azcraig.us

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Try one of those odor removal products that pet supply stores carry. You may have to leave the stool outside for a while to let the odor dissipate.

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wrote:

The best product is called Nature's Miracle. You soak the problem area with the stuff & then let the enzymes do their work.
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says...

Yeah, I've heard that, and tried it when my elder cat had become incontinent and had chosen a section of the WTW carpet in my bedroom for a couple of her doings. Treated the area twice, in fact. After a full week, I gave up and used an Xacto knife to remove the affected carpet. A conversation later with someone in the restoration business confirmed my experience. (And, a visit to the home of one of the folks who had so highly recommended the product.)
I'm afraid that IME the only real solution to this problem has been already suggested by another poster - remove all the upholstery, possibly refinish, and start again.
Banty
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After a full week, I gave up and used an Xacto

Natures Miracle takes about 2 weeks to break down the urine. It worked for me. I left an umbrella on my front porch and it was visited by the local tom, soaked it down, 2 weeks later no smell.
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yep, replace the fabric and padding.... you'll also have to use a sealant on the wood to keep the odor from returning.
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Pet stores carry "Petzyme" which has enzymes and bacteria. Works extremely well even on cat puke and crap.
cheers, -Alan with 4 cats
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Simple, Give away the stool, then the cat!!
All cat pee inside eventually..and nothing takes the smell out.. IMHO
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On 1 Jan 2004 07:55:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@cityserve.com (Arroyo) wrote:

How come I **KNEW** this was posted by an AOL'er even before I resolved the IP?
eq
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On Thu, 01 Jan 2004 12:15:01 -0500, equalizer <> wrote:

Because AOLers are clueless morons?
Seems obvious to me.
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If it has not dried, and it's removable, you can run the fabric through the washer a few times. Regardless, the foam is history and needs to be replaced. If it's dried and/or the fabric is not removable then you need to replace both the foam and the fabric. Solutions like Nature's Miracle are good for most other cases but when it comes to cat urine -- forget it. Nothing works against cat urine.
Something else you need to consider at this point is whether or not to keep the cat. Once a cat starts using the furniture as his litter box, he never stops. In other words -- expect future incidents. We finally had to isolate our cat to an area where there is no furniture -- the one time he managed to get out he destroyed the cushions on a $2500 sofa set. As much as I want to eliminate the animal altogether, I have a wife to contend with -- I may finally have her convinced he needs to find a new home but I'm not holding my breath.
James
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-- I may finally have her convinced he needs to find a new home but I'm

we are praying that our daughter will take HER CAT with her to graduate school, and get it out of the basement!
--
read and post daily, it works!
rosie

as I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch
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Darn cats! When we were house hunting, we fell in love with a wonderful house in an even more wonderful area and we would've bought it if it weren't for the stomach-turning cat urine stench the basement and garage were permeated with. We liked the house so much we were considering some kind of treatment to rid the cement floors in those areas of the stench but our real estate agent told us to just forget about it; she didn't think the stench could be completely eliminated. I still think that we could've fixed the problem treating the cement floors chemically, but what do I know!
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Getting off the topic of home repair (well maybe not...), the solution for my elder incontinent cat was that she immediately became an outdoor cat. Not ideal, but she was something of a huntress to begin with and found that pleasure for the last three years of her life (as she was so proud to show me many times!) So, depending on your situation, you may have a less drastic solution to consider.
Banty
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You might try chlorine bleach and fresh air on the foam. But the bigger issue here is WHY the cat peed. Sometimes it's a sign of illness. More often it's a symptom of an unhappy or disturbed cat. If it's a male, they spray to mark their territory. Has another cat been in the house or in the neighbourhood? Other questions...Is the cat neutered? Is it an outdoor cat? I would go to some of the cat pages and groups and inquire and/or consult your vet. ds
JNJ says...

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On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 08:39:10 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@epsno.com (Jedd Haas) wrote:

Look for a product called "Nature's Miracle" in your pet store.
Jeff
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And once you find it - leave it on the shelf.
Banty
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Jeff Cochran wrote:

Been there, done that, still ended up ripping out the carpet and pad. The only "miracle" is the amount of money being made on products that do not work.
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