Cat 5 wiring

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bud-- wrote:

No.
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wrote:

It is called overkill. The phone company has been using 2 pair for......well a long time. :)
The telephone guy shushed me for suggesting he use the other pair to add another phone line in an office. They don't even use the extra wires to fix a broken one. It pays better not to ask such questions.
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You're just not separating the wires. The way I do it is strip too much (2-3") of the outer jacket off, untwist the wires, separate them fan-like by color, flatten & straighten them, then cut off the excess so that there's just enough wire showing out of the outer jacket, then slide the connector on & crimp.
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An electrician's scissors are great for these cable jobs.
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Mark:
The first 50 I did took me 15 minutes each and I, probably, had 50% success rate. Now I do 1 in less than a minute and my success rate is, as far as I know, 100%.
Get them flat, cut very straight, and don't let go until you slide them in all the way.
Also, I always wear magnfyinh glasses when doing it.
Good luck.
BR

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mark wrote:

Are you using quality crimping tool or El Cheapo one?
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mark wrote:

Make sure you have the right connectors for the cable. Connectors designed for solid wire have contacts that go around the the conductor after piercing through the insulation, and those for stranded wire pierce the wire down the center.
Also ensure that the wires are properly paired. In simplest terms, one twisted pair should go to the center pins (4 and 5). Each wire of the second pair goes outside to the first pair on pins 3 and 6. The third pair goes to pins 1 and 2, and the fourth pair goes to 7 and 8. A common mistake is to pair pins 3 and 4, then 5 and 6. This will pass a simple electrical test, but may cause poor data transmission.
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mark wrote:

For neophytes I always recommend the EZ-RJ45 Crimping System:
http://tinyurl.com/6rqm24
Here is a link to a good how-to on installing RJ45 connectors:
http://www.duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable1.htm
TDD
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mark wrote:

to the jack and punch it down. Then you use a patch cable to connect to whatever device is being used on that jack.
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This bears repeating: the solid-conductor cable that runs in walls is meant to be punched down to the back of female jacks, either at a patch panel or at a wall jack. Crimp-on male plugs are normally for stranded-conductor patch cords. Solid conductor cable is more likely to break if it's frequently flexed, and hard-to-crimp translates to unreliable connections.
If you really want to do it, I believe there are plugs and crimp tools made for solid conductors. If yours aren't labeled as such, they're not.
Chip C Toronto
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Chip C wrote:

Exactly.
they are a mickey mouse concept because they aren't approved or rated by anyone. They somehow evolved as an item for use for folks who don't understand why they are a really crappy way to do things and that the right way isn't much more involved.
We are fighting this now at a temporary office. Someone was thinking they were saving the prior owner money or maybe they consulted the experts at home depot because they crimped plugs onto solid cable. It is a holy mess, you touch stuff and it looses connectivity and wiggle it to get it working. This is exactly for the reason you noted earlier. 28 AWG solid is pretty fragile. We are redoing everything properly next week.

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wrote:

a whole house audio system which uses their female wall jacks, necessitating me to crimp on connectors to plug into their wall jacks. Also, this cable is running through plastic conduit, which will not allow me to use premade cables due to the size of the connector. I am also doing wall jacks thru the house, which do use punch down jacks. I realize my main snafu was stripping the conductors, instead I now leave the insulation and crimp through it. Many thanks to all that contributed.......
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