Cat 5 Cable Conduit

Page 1 of 3  
Can I use 1/2 inch pvc conduit to run Cat 5 underground ?
Or must I go with a larger size ??
Thanks in advance
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would probably be easier with 3/4 inch. They suggest pushing rather than pulling Cat 5 cable through conduits but it can be pulled if you tape your cable to your fishtape or wire every five to ten feet.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Isn't cat 5 about the size of coaxial ? My intention is to push/pull the cable as I'm placing the conduit in the trench. So wouldn't 1/2" conduit do the trick ? Ray
> > Can I use 1/2 inch pvc conduit to run Cat 5 underground ? > > > > Or must I go with a larger size ?? > > > > Thanks in advance > > > > > It would probably be easier with 3/4 inch. They suggest pushing rather than > pulling Cat 5 cable through conduits but it can be pulled if you tape your > cable to your fishtape or wire every five to ten feet. > > > Bill > >
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How far are you "pulling" it? How long are your conduit sections? You could just hold one end up and drop it through to the other.
Now the big question.... What are you doing with it?
NJBrad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The distance is about 150'. I'd like to use 20' sections but could use 10' sections. It was suggested to me to use cat 5 because I want to have cable tv, computer, phone and an intercom set up in the shop. Will this type cable do the trick ?
> > > > Can I use 1/2 inch pvc conduit to run Cat 5 underground ? > > > > > > > > Or must I go with a larger size ?? > > > > > > > > Thanks in advance > > > > > > > > > > > It would probably be easier with 3/4 inch. They suggest pushing > > > rather > > than > > > pulling Cat 5 cable through conduits but it can be pulled if you > > > tape > > your > > > cable to your fishtape or wire every five to ten feet. > > > > > > > > > Bill > > > > > > > > > > > > > > How far are you "pulling" it? How long are your conduit sections? You > could just hold one end up and drop it through to the other. > > Now the big question.... What are you doing with it? > > NJBrad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You could use a lubricant to push it easier. The Borg sells something like that made by Ideal.
EJ

You
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ray, Cat 5 wiring is an outdated standard which I would only recommend for telephone. For residential high speed data lines Cat 6 is now the standard. For cable TV you will need to pull a coax cable which I recommend RGB 6 Quad Shield for optimum results. For intercom wire you must adhere to the intercom manufacturer's specifications to get the best quality sound.
To get all this in one conduit, 1" would be the minimum size that I would use though 11/4" would be an easier pull and allow for additional lines to be added in the future.
Putting the wires in the conduit as you lay them in the ground is not an efficient way to go. You will get dirt inside of the conduit, your wires will be laying in the dirt and picking it up as you go along. It will be very messy and worse if it rains while you are in the middle of this. You will have a hard enough time keeping the conduit clean as you glue each piece. You should also wait until the glue has fully cured before installing any wires as it may affect the insulation of the wire. You may find the wire getting glued to the conduit and you will no longer be able pull it through any more.
My suggestion is to put all of the conduit in the ground first. This is standard practice for professionals. Do not put more than 360 degrees worth of bends in one run without a pull box or condulet. For easier pulling it is recommended that you keep the total bends to 270 degrees per run.
To install the wire in the conduit get yourself some lightweight string and a small lightweight bag such as the kind that you get from stores after a purchase. You could also cut a piece of a plastic bag into a square and make a little parachute by attaching a lightweight string to each corner. You will also need a shop vacuum. Tie the string onto the handles of the bag and put it into end of the pipe. Someone will have to feed the string into the pipe as you go to the other end with the shop vac. Have the shop vac on suction and put the hose over the end of the pipe and let it suck the string through the pipe.
Once the string is out at the shop vac end connect a heavier pull rope to the string and pull it into the conduit. Set up your spools or coils of wire so that they can be unwound easy and without tangles. Spools can be mounted on a steel conduit or rebar and hung between the steps of a ladder to facilitate the pulling. Attach all of your wires onto the rope in a tight compact manner. Put some pulling lubricant into the conduit and continue to apply it as the wires are fed into the conduit. PVC conduit seems to have more friction than metal conduit so be generous with the lubricant.
Good luck,
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

You
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

standard.
Quad
Does CAT-6 give you more bandwidth? I ran CAT-5 in my home about a year ago. I get pretty much full 100 mbps throughput. Any reason for me to upgrade it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Buck Turgidson wrote:

Hi, Cable? Time for wireless now. Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nah. Still not fast enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Buck Turgidson wrote:

Nah, but they're trying to get CAT-6 as the standard for new installation. Spec says 200MHz, 1Gb bandwidth, but still a 100m maximum rated length.
http://www.tiaonline.org/standards/category6/cat6_for_search_engine.htm
Even if you don't attach premium networking products to the cable, or use the bandwidth, the theory is it will be there when you (or the next owner) upgrade.
The residential network cable market is collapsing, though, as many consumers turn to wireless ethernet -- generally 10Mbs, available in 100Mbps. Consumer media devices are starting to appear with built-in wireless connectivity. It's hard to say whether that CAT6 will be needed at all down the road.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Hartung wrote:

Hi, And they're talking about power line based broad band. Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Call me old fashion. I like my hardwiring. Reminds me of a technician friend of mine. He took his new laptop computer outside to play around with Windows XP while sitting on his patio. He accidentally got into his neighbor's wireless network and was able to surf the web.

year
to
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmm, Sounds like it was not configured properly. WEP... Tony
John Grabowski wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

They're talking, but you hear a lot of static. (Joke about the problems being encountered in trials.)
Where it comes from != how it gets around your house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Hartung wrote:

Hi, As a long time ham op. I worry about that too. Tony, VE6CGX
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Hartung wrote:

Oops, I confoozled myself there; those are the CAT5 numbers. Wireless ethernet comes in 11Mpbs and 54Mbps varieties right now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use a wireless 10Mbs, with a DSL running at 1 meg, and never get full speed when roaming the house, or lose connection altogether. I'm also seriously considering pulling cat5 or 6 through the house. It will not be easy for myself, the lower level has a sheetrocked ceiling, and I'm not a experienced wire fish person, but will attempt it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Buck Turgidson wrote:

for 100mbps, cat5 is more than sufficient. The only reason you would need cat6 is if you go to gigabit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

CAT5e is the standard which I would recommend. Its good for 10BaseT or 100BASE-T Ethernet and support up to 100 megabit per second data transmission (100 MBPS). Currently I am working in a 7 story building which is being built in a medical complex and all the computer networking cable being installed is Cat5e.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.