Casters needed for a heavy workbench

I recently built a 4' x 8' workbench with 4"X6" corner posts and 3/4" plywood for two shelves and a double thickness top. I', using the shelves for wood storage on one and tool storage on the other. As you can tell, the workbench is now very heavy. I am looking for a set of casters that would mount to the sides of the corner posts, and allow me to raise and move the table. My Hitachi table saw has similar casters that have a lever that either raises or lowers the wheels just enough to bring legs off the floor. Does anyone know of this type casters? I've done some searches, but there seems to be a large variety of casters types. I would like to be able to move the workbemch without having to remove everything from it first.
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Have a look at machine tool casters at suppliers like Enco, Grainger, McMaster, etc. Goodle other sources such as 'material handling' for even more ideas. Lee Valley, Grizzly, others should have casters , too.
Joe
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A bunch here: http://tinyurl.com/mo5lln Some have wheel locks. You might check Northern Tool. I've never gotten anything from them so don't know much about them. J.C. Whitney??
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I don't believe the OP is looking for casters per se. I believe he is looking for a "system" whereby the workbench can normally rest on it's legs so as to be sturdy, but allow him to raise it onto casters should he want to move it.
Imagine trying to use a long breaker bar on something mounted in the workbench vise if the workbench was up on casters. You could walk around in circles for hours! Even locking casters are going to give somewhat.
I bought something like this for my tablesaw, although mine was "universal" in that it came with the wheels, corner brackets and the fot operated lift mechanism, but no "stringers". You cut your own "stringers" to fit the base of your tool. Works pretty good.
http://www.toolking.com/deltamachinery_50729.aspx
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

ShopSmiths used to come with those, built into the 1950s-modern styled base. A big pedal on each end would lift it up on casters, and pushing the pedals again would drop it down on non-skid pads. I think my brother ended up with the family machine. Sucker was expensive, even back then.
(GoogleGoogleGoogle)
I'll be damned- they still exist, and still sell the MkV.
Cute idea, and probably okay for the home woodworker that didn't mind spending half their time on setup. But a little light for any production work.
Harbor Freight usually has a pretty good selection of casters, but I have never seen lifting casters there. I wonder if OP could adapt a piano dolley to his requirements? Ask at nearest piano dealer- see if they have a beat-up one they were planning to replace.
-- aem sends...
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Rather than raising the table to engage the casters, I would suggest mounting the casters on the bottom of the 4x6 posts so that the bench can be moved at will.
When desiring to "defeat" the casters, engage appropriately designed & installed "legs".
These legs can be large diameter (1" or bigger) all thread mounted via a coupling nut welded to a plate & mounted on the side of the table corner posts.
Or they could be something as simple as a couple nuts counterbored & pressed to a 4x4 that is in turn mounted to the side of the corner posts with plywood splice plates.
To engage the casters just raise the threaded rods a bit above the floor; to "fix" the table, drive the all thread down against the floor.
Steel on concrete is a bit slippery......... crutch tips can help eliminate that.
cheers Bob
How often do oyu need to move this table?
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First, if this suggestion was used, the 4x6 legs may have to be cut to make up for the additional height of casters. Maybe not a big deal, but it could be if there are supports or brackets or other hardware in the way.
Second, for a workbench of this size/weight, you're going to need some decent sized casters. I'm not sure what size would be required, so let's say 3", just for fun. Add in the height of the mounting hardware and we're probably looking at 4" overall. So, now we loosen the all- thread and drive it down to the floor enough so that the weight is off of the casters.
Now we've got this massive workbench, orginally built with 4 x 6 legs, actually supported by 4 inches of 1" all-thread at each post. Doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of building a sturdy workbench?
As you said: "Steel on concrete is a bit slippery, crutch tips can help eliminate that." so you are aware that all lateral forces will be transmitting down to the legs.
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if the table only needs moved infrequently use bottle jack and some furniture dollies.
this way the table doesnt need any major modification beyond some bottle jack lifting spots
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Use swinging auxiliary legs: Mount the casters on a board the width of the table. Mount the board to the inside of the legs with a hinge at the top so that the casters swing down to be one-half inch lower than the bottom of the legs. Swing the board down and clamp it in place long enough to move the table, then remove the clamps and swing the board back up.
I've never done this, but I've seen it in several plans. You can get fancy and design the auxiliary legs so the automatically lock in both positions, so you have ropes to pull, or so they swing into place if you just lift the end of the table.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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