Caste Iron Drain


I have a '29 house that I'm working on the kitchen drain.
There are a whole series of ~ 2.4 " (OD) cast iron elbows that come out of the wall and flow into the main line.
What I'd like to do is replumb that with PVC down to the existing cast iron drain.
How do I do that without damaging the main line? What do I seal it back up with later?
Jeff
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On Thu, 02 Sep 2010 08:34:48 -0400, Jeff Thies wrote:

I have PVC going from the tub into a flange on the main cast line. Looks like some kind of hardened putty around the PVC where it goes into the main flange. Hasn't leaked in 21 years. I think if I were to replace it I'd use some silicone rubber to seal the PVC into the cast flange. I think they used molten lead to seal the cast unions together. Don't know how I would dig a piece of pipe out of the main line. It could be just roped and doped in too. You'll find out once you cut the flow line from the kitchen at the main line just how it's been sealed.
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On 9/2/2010 8:55 AM, Hugh Jassolle wrote:

I'm thinking lead.
I think I'll cut the line going into the main drain just below the next higher elbow. I could either use a no hub or Fernco (looks like a heavy duty no hub to me). I'd kind of like to take the lead out so the drain will end a little lower beneath the floor joists. Not sure my torch would make a dent with all that cast iron to wick away the heat.
Jeff
Don't know

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On Thu, 02 Sep 2010 09:26:01 -0400, Jeff Thies wrote:

You won't do it with a hand held propane torch. You'll need a large torch, one that runs off a 20lb propane tank. Be careful about building code if you use flex couplings. Some locales don't allow them.
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My acetylene torch would not get the lead out of my main. I tried for quite some time.
My PVC is now connected with a fernco. About 10 years.
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I had a cracked toilet flange replaced many years ago. I don't recall what kind of torch the plumber (I know my limits!) used but I don't recall it being all that hard for him to replace the flange. It was kind of fun to watch the "old school" way of plumbing.
What we need today is a SharkBite toilet flange. ;-)
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On Thu, 02 Sep 2010 10:58:44 -0700, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Was the flange on iron or lead? 50 or so years ago they used a lot of lead verticals up to the flange from the main soil pipe. Since it was on the end of the pipe it might have not taken as many BTU's as someone trying to pull 2 inch pipe out of the middle of a soil tree.
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If I recall correctly, it was a caste flange on a caste pipe.
I know he used lead and oakum to put the new one in, but now that I think about it I don't recall if he busted the old one out and then just cleaned up the joint or if he actually melted it out.
Too long ago. Sorry.
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On Thu, 02 Sep 2010 13:02:18 -0700, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That's ok LOL. I did a whole bunch of those starting out as a plumber's apprentice back in the 70's. And wouldn't hesitate tackling my cast soil tree. I recently put a flange repair kit atop the lead riser under my new toilet. I didn't feel like ripping the lead out and replacing it with cast. One thing though, unless the floor is 100% sound around the flange the lead pipe will eventually deform. I used a large tube of silicone to seal from below and above and to help stabilize the area because I didn't want to get into reflooring the bathroom and fixing it like it should have been fixed. I wasn't feeling well and without a working commode this was the quickest way to do it. Surprisingly it's held up well. The toilet is solidly bolted to the floor and leak-free. One day I will have to do it right if I own this house long enough.
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i would inspect main soil stack at this age it may be rusted bad from inside...and need replaced
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Fernco makes internal-locking toilet flanges in 4 & 6 in.
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Jeff Thies wrote:

There's a rubber seal that goes into the iron fitting, then the PVC goes into the rubber. There are a couple thickenesses or the rubber seal for varying fittings.
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Bob F wrote:

See Donuts http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/donuts-o-rings
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On 9/2/2010 9:39 PM, Bob F wrote:

Ow!
Is this something a good plumbing supply place would stock? I'm thinking Fernco wouldn't want to be hearing from one off me.
Jeff

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