Cast Iron Radiator replacement

Hi Folks, I've been asked to replace a old cast iron radiator with a similar model. The current one has developed a couple of leaks. My question is other then shutting off the water and disconnecting the feeder line then reverse the process, Is there anything else I should do ?
Thanks Dick
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If you have to ask and are being paid its not for you, but even since you are asking its obvious you dont know boilers, if the radiator valve wont shut off then what, the system drains and you have to fill it and blead the whole thing, but you sill need to check level and know what to do. Anything can happen, have fun.
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Platebanger

Turn off the system. If the radiator is not isolated you may have to drain the whole system or at least enough so that everything in the system above and on the same floor is empty. If it's not isolated you may want to take this opportunity to put shut off valves and drains in so that if you need to work on it in the future you don't have to drain the whole thing again.
Something to think about. I just took three radiators out of my house to have them sandblasted and painted. One from the second floor and two from the first. All three are the smallest radiators in my house and they are very heavy. The biggest weighing over 310 lbs (yes I put them all on the bathroom scale cause I had to know). I can't imagine taking any of the larger ones out. I got them all from where they are mounted in my house into my van to the sandblaster (they had a forklift there) and back to my house alone. I had a friend help me get them out of my van and into the house so I wouldn't nick the new paint job up. He helped me get them to within a few feet of their final destination. The next day I moved the one on the second floor (about 250 lbs) into position. I drained the system and took the caps off the pipes. I needed to move the radiator (about 10 inches) to thread the new valves onto the pipe. "POP" there goes my back. I was home alone and it took me two hours before I could get to a phone to call for help. It's not the first time my back went out and I'm sure it won't be the last. The dumb thing is I could have done it without getting hurt. I got impatient and started muscling things around. I thought my way through the radiators entire journey and muscled my way through the last 10 inches. Be careful.
Dave
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Shut off the electric to the system. drain the lines.
Oil or grease the fittings before you thread em back together. Greasy fittings slide together easier, you'll get a tighter fit.
Same deal with galvanized pipe unions or black iron gas pipe unions.
--

Christopher A. Young
Do good work.
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