Carrier Heat Pump

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On Thu, 14 Nov 2013 10:45:27 -0800 (PST), jamesgang

You're wrong, of course.

In your universe air conditioning doesn't work? Amazing.
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Sure it does, The cool room still has heat in it. When the refrigerant goes through those coils the heat in the room heats up the refrigerant and makes it boil into a vapor.. Then the vapor is compressed and that makes it hotter. It then goes outside and the hot vapor is cooled off by the outside air and it goes to a liquid. It is just a mater of what is actually hot and what is cool, or less hot.
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On Thu, 14 Nov 2013 20:45:35 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Now do you understand why you're wrong?
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On Thu, 14 Nov 2013 10:45:27 -0800 (PST), jamesgang

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On

well yes, once you cross that "balance point" where the heat available can no longer match the heat needed, then the house will get colder.
And consider that when the outside temp falls such that the outdoor evap starts to ice up, the heat exchange efficiency gets even worse, so yes there is a sort of sudden decrease in performance when the outdoor coil starts to ice up.
Looking at performance curves is not the same is living with one.
Mark
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On 11/9/2013 2:51 AM, Kate wrote:

like it might be. On my HP/propane furnace, it will sometime, but not always do that, and then switch back to straight HP. Actually, the unit is running in AC mode using the aux heat (propane in my case) to evaporate any ice on the outside unit. I think the unit guesses, based one outside temp and maybe other factors, how often to de-ice. Much depends on the outside humidity, too. In my case, it seems to do it way too much, but the alternative, ice build up, wouldn't be good. So I figure they error on the side of safety.
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On Saturday, November 9, 2013 7:54:59 AM UTC-5, Art Todesco wrote:

Two things. It's my understanding that heat pumps just reverse the compressor flow to heat the outside coil for defrosting. Do they turn on aux heat at the inside unit while doing that? I never really thought about it but I guess it might be needed. Otherwise you'd get cold air blowing into the house. So the short 3 min aux heat cycle sounds like it could be that.
But even if that is the case and it was set wrong, it seems kind of strange to have the defrost cycle even able to be set at 47F and above, no? You would think that the setting range would be a lot lower to avoid problems like this.
On my HP/propane furnace, it will sometime, but not

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On 11/8/2013 11:51 PM, Kate wrote:

electric backup heat installed in a rental property a couple of years ago. A new programmable thermostat was included. We discovered that the backup heat would come on if the thermostat discovered the room temperature was more than 2 degrees lower than the set point of the thermostat.
We had the same type programmable thermostat installed in our current mfg. home with heat pump. Same thing with the thermostat. More than one degree difference and the backup heat comes on.
The reason is efficiency. The least cost heating is to maintain the same temperature night and day. The heat pump will do this best when the set temperature and the room temperature remain the same.
Set your thermostat to the temperature you want, for every day of the week, both night and day. A one degree lower night temp will keep the backup off, but will run the heatpump steady until the house temp comes up to the daytime temp.
The heating company will not tell you this up front.
Paul
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On Saturday, November 9, 2013 10:53:16 AM UTC-5, Paul Drahn wrote:

Only if aux heat, eg electric has to kick in to get the temp back up. Otherwise, with say a nat gas or oil furnace, cost is lower if you set it back at night. If you can't set it back, then you're going to be needing to supply more heat to the house to keep it maintained constantly. That's a negative.
The heat pump will do this best when the set

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On Sat, 09 Nov 2013 07:53:16 -0800, Paul Drahn

That's not all that unusual. A new thermostat is in order.

That's ridiculous. The thermostat wouldn't last the week.

Not believing it. Heat pumps can take a long time to recover in really cold weather but in somewhat warmer weather there is no reason to waste the energy. I prefer it colder at night that during the day. Any system that didn't allow me the flexibility would soon be gone.

So what? That's true of any system. That's how thermostats work.

Any idiot should know how a thermostat works.
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Kate wrote:

I think you should have him come back out and reset it so the aux indicator light comes on. Should be no big deal and since it is a new system they should have no problem doing that for you. Even if you could figure out how to do that change yourself, I think that you would be better off having the installation company tech do it. That way, they won't be able to say that you messed something up by working on it yourself (even if you didn't).
Also, there is an alt.hvac Usenet newsgroup in case you want to try your post there. It used to be an awful group full of nasty morons, but lately it seems more sane and sometimes helpful.
Let us know what you end up doing and what the outcome is on this.
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I'd want to know but that's your decision.
Smart thermostats can control the aux heat usage. Mine is set up to run without aux for two hours before turning it on[*]. It would be better to know the outside temperature but I don't have that option.
[*]it might be set up to disable aux heat completely now - can't remember how I left it
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On 11/9/2013 2:51 AM, Kate wrote:

Yes I would want the light on and if they installed the thermostat you could void the warranty by messing with it.
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