Carrier Heat Pump

Page 1 of 2  
I need some advice please.
I recently had a Carrier Heat Pump installed. The air conditioner works perfect. Now we are into fall and I noticed that even though the temps are still above 47 degrees, my auxiliary heat would come on. Most of the time, it would stay on for three minutes, then go off. It is my understanding it should not come on until it is below 35 degrees.
The Carrier tech came out and locked it out at 35 degrees, so I should be OK now. I wasn't aware that this could be done.
He asked me if I wanted to have the Auxiliary Heat indicator turned off on the thermostat. I said sure. Now, I am wondering if I did the right thing. If it is still not working properly I have no way of knowing.
What would you do? Have the man come back and adjust it so the aux light indicator comes back on, or just leave it? I would do it myself, but I believe he disconnected a wire at the back of the thermostat, and I don't feel comfortable messing with the electrical wires.
Many thanks!
Kadee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/09/2013 01:51 AM, Kate wrote:

You /do/ want the indicator on to keep you informed.
Also , where are you located? Heat pumps are not a great idea if you live in the US Northern states.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, November 9, 2013 6:19:40 AM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

s

t

t

You have to wonder about the competence of an installer that would put in a new heatpump system where it puts on auxillary heat when it's 47 outside. And maybe the design of a system or thermostat where it puts it on for 3 minutes at all. What does it figure out in 3 minutes that it didn't know to begin with? Maybe that it is generating sufficient heat from just the pump. But it should be able to figure that out with just a temp sensor on the outside unit.
Whether she can figure out where the wire goes and do it herself, IDK. If it's a commonly available thermostat, there should be install instructions on the web. However if it's a Carrier one that's only dealer installed, etc, may not be able to find it.
I would definitely want the indicator on. Can't imagine why she told him to take it off. That he wanted to take it off is yet another sign to me that I wouldn't want this guy installing anything for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you're going to own a house, you should learn to be comfortable with low voltage wires. if it's a new thermostat, you have the instructions for it, right?
I think the thermostat uses 14 volts but even if it's 20, you can't hurt yourself with that even if you held the wires in your wet hands. Even if you put them all in your mouth (though I'm not recommending that.) You'd get a tingle and your tongue would jerk back, but even if you could force your tongue to stay there, I don' tthink you could hurt anything. (I don't force my tongue to stay on even low votlage electric wirees.) Just write down what color wire went to what number screw before you disconnect anything (you shouldnb't have to disconnect anything, unless it's just one wire that goes somewhere else. More likely there will be an unconnected wire you have to connect. Also learn to make drawings, of all the screws with what color wire goes to each. Drawings are very important. It's easy to forget without them.
Do the instructions say which wire goes to the light indicator? If not call the guy and ask him and tell him you a) didn't have enough time to give a good answer (if you want to sort of blame him) or b) you made a mistake when you told him to disconnect the light (maybe a better approach since people like humility) And you'd be happy to connect it yourself if he'd tell you which wire and which screw. If he says he will do it, ask the charge. He may say free, esp. if he is near your house at times. If he wants more than you want to pay, say you canb't allocate more money to this, and maybe he'll do it for free or at least he'll answer your question.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/9/2013 6:45 AM, micky wrote:

Might want to do some research before encouraging others to start working on their own wiring. I installed furnaces for six years, and all the low voltage thermostats I did were nominal 24 VAC, and often you'd see 26 or 27 on a VOM. Since you don't know the typical low voltage for stats, do you REALLY think you should tell people to work on them....
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Nov 2013 07:28:47 -0500, Stormin Mormon

You're going to get hurt on 26-27V? It's pretty easy and safe if YOU'RE SURE IT'S A LO VOLTAGE SYSTEM. Some aren't (though a heat pump's thermostat should be).
The bigger danger is shorting the 24V supply and blowing a fuse in the air handler, or worse. BTDT. Just follow the instructions and it's not difficult or dangerous.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Nov 2013 14:21:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Good points. Noted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

yes if you decide to wire it yourself, turn off the power to protect the eq uipment.
also, no one mentioned that most heat pump systems use a 2 stage thermostat . If the room is only a little cooler then the set point, the heat pump co mes on for stage 1. But if the room is more then 2 or 3 deg cooler than th e set point, like when you first turn up the heat, then stage 2 will come o n (the aux heat will come on). This is normal. Think of it a 2 thermostat s, stage 1 is set for the setting you see, and stage 2 is set a few degrees below that. Once you understand that, if you want to keep the aux stage 2 heat from coming on, you make smaller increases in the setting. If you ma ke a big increase in the setting, the aux heat will come on and that is no rmal.
When it is below about 32 outside and damp, I turn off the heat pump to avo id the defrost business, but I have oil for the aux heat so its not so expe nsive.
Mark
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 9 Nov 2013 16:38:51 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That's the point. The second stage is often resistive heat. It's better to avoid that, if at all possible. Smart thermostats allow one to disable the second stage unless it's really needed.

Most homes don't have such backup heat. It's not warranted where heat pumps are most useful.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At the price of oil, I would think it would be much more expensive to heat with oil unless it got below 25 deg or lower.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Nov 2013 10:45:45 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Of course that depends on the local price of electricity, but it sure would here. It so rarely gets below 25F for any period of time that backup heat is senseless (at least as a cost savings).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, November 10, 2013 10:45:45 AM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:

agreed, and that is what I said except at 32 instead of 25. Below 32 if you account for the inefficiency of the defrosting and the wear and tear on the compressor and the discomfort of being cold in the house, it starts to pay to burn some oil.
I'd like to see someone develop a solar assisted heat pump. Use some solar heat to get the air up to 32 so the heat pump can work well.
Mark
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Nov 2013 14:13:19 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Instead of wasting money on a solar assisted heat pump (daytime is not when you need the heat) why not do something useful and buy a ground-source heat pump?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/10/13 11:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

By "ground source", you mean geothermal, is that correct?
Is there a temperature range below which geothermal needs an "auxilliary assist" (i.e., electrical heat strips) as well? I thinking of an area like Pennsylvania, where temps can drop down close to 0 at least a few days of winter.
Also - I see plenty of homes with "regular" (non-geothermal) heat pumps installed around north/north central PA. When shopping for a home that has a non-geothermal heat pump installed, at what seasonal temps does it become impractical or non-economical?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, November 11, 2013 5:38:31 PM UTC-5, John Albert wrote:

My understanding is that geothermal systems are sized so they are all that is required. They're expensive enought without having the added complications of a hybrid system. That is the big drawback, the huge initial expense compared to other altermatives.

That depends on a lot of factors. One big one is the COP of the unit. Is it a 15 year old one or a newer, high efficiency one? How well insulated is the house? I think in most cases the problem isn't that it's not economic to run the heat pump. They have decent COP's down into the teens. The problem is that even though you're still getting heat produced at a reasonable cost, you just can't get enough heat to supply what the house needs, unless the house is exceptionally designed to need less heating than a typical home. I think for a typical house, with a relatively new higher eff heat pump, that point probably occurs in the 20s, to maybe teens,depending on how efficient it is, how it's sized, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No, though some people may call it that. Geothermal is passive.

The outside air temperature doesn't matter at all. If the ground gets cold enough to require such, then the ground "source" isn't big enough.

My brother had an air-source (the alternative to ground-source) heat pump in N. Philly. Around freezing efficiency falls off rapidly. At some point, probably above 20F, they stop working entirely without resistive heat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, November 11, 2013 8:04:14 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

At the risk of setting off another profanity laced response, why don't you answer the question and explain what exactly you meant? AFAIK, ground sourced heat pump for a house typically translates into geothermal. So, if it's not that, then what is "ground sourced", in this context?

It does matter to the extent that the geothermal system has to be large enough to deliver the heat needed at the lowest outside temps the house will experience.

I don't believe that's true. The curves I've seen, for modern high efficiency heat pumps, COP falls off gradually through a wide operating range. There isn't a sudden acceleration in loss of performance below 32F. COP might go down by 15% from 30 to 20. The problem is that while the performance is gradually decreasing, the need for more heat is also increasing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Nov 2013 07:34:04 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I did, dumb ass. I can't help the fact that you're illiterate, trader.

The heat is actively pulled from the ground (heat pumped from the ground), rather than passively (heat passively removed from the hotter ground). There *IS* a difference.

Not just the lowest outside temps, but the integral of the (delta) temperature over time. You are actively cooling the ground. That can't be done forever, unless you've tapped into an infinite heat sump, like a "river". If the heat source is too small, eventually you will cool the ground enough that the heat pump has no heat to pump. Unlike an air-source heat pump, this happens over a much longer time (over a heating "season").

Your religion is hardly important.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, November 12, 2013 5:25:40 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:


And there you have it demonstrated again folks. KRW is incapable of answering any questions civily.

Again, you posted:
" Instead of wasting money on a solar assisted heat pump (daytime is not when you need the heat) why not do something useful and buy a ground-source heat pump?"
To which JA replied:
"By "ground source", you mean geothermal, is that correct?
And then you say:
"No, though some people may call it that. Geothermal is passive."
Some people? AFAIK, virtually everyone refers to a ground based heat pump system as one form of geothermal including experts in the field, eqpt manufacturers, companies installing it, govts, etc. Google and you will see. So, what are you talking about?
Around freezing efficiency falls off rapidly. At

As usual, no facts, just curt replies that don't address anything. Typical, when you know you're wrong, yet again. If you have COP data from a typical modern residential heat pump system that shows the efficiency falling off rapidly below 32F, I'm sure we'd all like to see it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, November 12, 2013 5:25:40 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

That's just silly there is no difference. Heat moves from warmer to colder. There's no "pulling" verses "passive" transfer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.