Carpet vs hardwood for home sale?

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scribbled this interesting note:

Exactly. That's just $150.00 more to the realtor. They aren't motivated to do anything extra for $150.00.
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Ken Korona wrote:

Rip up the skanky carpet. Don't re-carpet.
Give the buyer an option: 1. You will refinish the floors, 2. You will recarpet the house with the buyer's choice, 3. You will reduce your selling price by $3,000 (or whatever) if the buyer takes it as-is.
Whether you re-finish the floors, leave the stained carpet, or put down new will be seen by a significant pool of prospects as a liability to overcome.
(Me, I'd take the price reduction, but others may have differing priorities.)
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<snip>>

This is a very rational approach, but unfortunately, many home buyers are not rational and don't have the ability to visualize what the house will look like once the floors are either finished or new carpet is installed. All they see is ugly floors and they can't get past that problem.
I was selling a very nice house last year, and the only fault with the house was worn out and stained carpet. In the sales flyer I clearly stated that I would replace the carpet in the house with a high grade carpet in whatever color/texture the buyer wanted. I didn't want to waste money installing new beige carpet if the eventual buyer really needed/wanted blue carpet. The one piece of feedback I got from most agents who showed the house was that the existing carpet was a real put-off for their clients regardless of my committment to replacing it with whatever the client wanted.
Things rocked on this way for several months, then I threw in the towel and installed inexpensive beige carpet. The house sold to the second family who saw it after the carpet replacement.
KB
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Get an estimate from a floor refinisher. Add to the price of the house then offer prospective buyers choice of refinished floors or $$ toward new carpet. A small enticement often can make the difference.

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If you have an interested buyer, yes, it can. OTOH, if the potential buyer is turned off by anything they see, they quickly lose interest and will not make an offer at all, but just move on to some other place. There is a TV show called "Sell This House" where they hold an open house and get commetns from hidden cameras. People snub the house and have no interest. Three days and a couple hundred bucks later, they are making offers at the asking price.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome /




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"If you have an interested buyer, yes, it can. OTOH, if the potential buyer is turned off by anything they see, they quickly lose interest and will not make an offer at all, but just move on to some other place. There is a TV show called "Sell This House" where they hold an open house and get commetns from hidden cameras. People snub the house and have no interest. Three days and a couple hundred bucks later, they are making offers at the asking price. -- Ed "
That's pretty much my thinking too. I would think trading old carpet for a refinished wood floor would be a tradeoff where the bucks spent, which aren't all that much, would be well worth it.
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hardwood
a
saleability
is
The hardwood may not need a full refinish. If it wasn't too bad before carpet was put down, the carpet was vacumed regularly, and no leaky kids or pets or spills made wet spots that were left wet, it may only need a good cleaning and a buffed wax job. You can spot-stain any bad spots, (like where grit filtered though in traffic paths) once it is clean, before you wax. Hardest part will be getting that damn tack strip up without doing damage. If carpet cleaners got those nails wet, there will be rust spots. Plus the holes will need filling. If pad was glued to floor, or if it self-welded like it sometimes does due to pressure and chemistry with the floor finish, you are probably SOL and will have to scrape and sand.
aem (not a fan of W/W carpet) sends....
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Ken Korona wrote:

Hardwood floors are always a feature, whether covered or not. I sure would not put down new carpet or refinish the floor unless it is a real buyer's market there. If you know the entire floor is in good shape, might consider taking up carpet in dining room or whatever is stained worst, or just pull up a corner so it can be seen. If you go to the trouble and cost of refinishing, you may end up with a buyer who wants to slap carpet down on top of it. We have a condo neighbor who tore up 5 rooms of brand new laminate wood flooring to put down tile when he purchased the unit :o)
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says...

Ah, a man of taste :)
Banty
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On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 23:23:03 -0500, "Ken Korona"

....
The bride is right, as mentioned here before. Check the stats or trends with your Realtor. I say go with the oak floor - I don't think they make 'em like that anymore, besides ya don't know what's under "skunky" carpet except a need for a good cleaning. Your wood floor is a value on your house now, make is show up in the sale. Forget allowances, etc. (if it's broke - fix it) IMHO things very much depend on the buyer and their intentions for the house and we don't always know that, so you have offers and counter offers. A primary occupant can enjoy less work in the future if the house needs less attention. You say "good shape". Would you buy it.. change it... move in a "turn key" home and enjoy it?
An Investor may simply change the carpeted rooms, lease for years and deal with it later.

Asking and getting is what the "right" buyer and the seller are willing settle and who is motivated the most.
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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