Carpet Tile in bathroom

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Yes, I know; you're not supposed to use c.t. in bathroom.
But my old white vinyl tile is so beat up, and I can't afford to redo the whole floor, that I thought I'd take a desperate leap and install some carpet tile over it until things pick up. I know I'm not building for the ages <g> just want it to look better.
This bathroom is small and well-ventilated. I would put sink and toilet rugs over the c.t. to protect high-traffic areas.
I have been on-line and looked at so many c.t.s that my head is swimming. Home Despot doesn't have a very attractive selection.
If I do this, should I opt for indoor/outdoor, or outdoor, or will indoor do it.
Any advice appreciated
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"not supposed to" is an understatement. People who put carpet in bathrooms (and kitchens) are out of their minds and should be institutionalized immediately.
Use self-stick vinyl "tiles" over the existing stuff. A friend of mine did that 5 years ago and it still looks good.
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I don't even like the throw rugs everyone seems to have in their bathrooms, and would not opt for carpet tiles in any case.
Men need to be taught to sit down when they pee, or the inevitable stains from standing up will look nasty on the rugs, not to mention, be unsanitary.
My personal preference for bathrooms is mosaic tile - easily scrubbed, and we just throw a bath towel on the floor to step out onto after bathing.
Okay - I know ... real men don't sit down.
Joe
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Real men learn how to aim by the time they're maybe 6 years old.
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"Real men learn how to aim by the time they're maybe 6 years old."
It's not the aiming - I can write my name in the snow ... it's all that shaking when yer done - Heh.
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J O E) wrote in 3252.bay.webtv.net:

ALL that shaking?! Errrrr, that's called jer...., ahem.
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wrote:
ull-3252.bay.webtv.net...

And learn to drink, not care and miss a bit later
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Yabbut, the bigger the hose the bigger the mess. And after a few beers, or a few too many, aiming isn't anything high on the list of priorities.
Steve
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I'm 62. Back when I was about 28 or so, I had the never ending fight about leaving the seat up or down. I left it up so I wouldn't pee on it at night, being the considerate human male that I am. My wife after falling in a few times, assaulted me on the rights and wrongs of leaving it up versus putting it down. It was an easy thing, I said, just check before you go, and it was the responsibility of that person. Case closed.
Then, old age crept in ahead of time. I walked into the dark bathroom one night, 2/3 asleep, and sat down on the throne that I had left the seat up on. Well, that extra 8" of freefall is enough to wake you up, if not the cold water spritz at the end. Hoo, boy, wide awake in 2/3 of a second.
I got it.
I never stand up now, as I would pee all over the place in the dark like a blind dog. If I turned on the light, I would be blinded for two to three minutes. I sit down when I go in the middle of the night, both because of advancing age, poor eyesight, being sleepy from medications I take, and I have this ritual of grabbing the sink in exactly the right spot that when I do sit down, I hit the bullseye reasonably close.
Funny how one's attitude and a lifelong behavior can change in 2/3 of a second.
She finally trained me to leave the lid down. Boy, I used to get some good belly laughs when she fell in. She nearly went hysterical when I did it, though.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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Use rugs for a bath you can take out and wash and dry, if its a rubber backing thet doesnt breath you will get water throught the seams and it will never dry , then the floor will mold, smell and rot. There are bath rug sets I think, pre cut.
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"Higgs Boson" wrote

I'd go instead with outdoor carpet in a solid sheet and cut outs where needed (not hard to do with the right *sharp* razor cutting tools).
This won't peel up in patches and you can literally take it outside and hose it off, scrub with a brush, whatever and let dry then bring it back in. It will not be damaged by a damp atmosphere and will not damage the floor under it. It also faster and easier to cut to fit, than sticking down the carpet tiles and not ending up with edges that show. They have some rather nice looking berber-ish types now. I'm looking at a tan and off white one for our bathroom where a toilet and tub replacement don't match the old tiles so edges show.
Same as you, don't want to spend much just right now and we already have a sunroom with this exterior carpet past 3 years with no issues. It's just rough laid down (cut to fit) and the edges don't curl up even in the one corner that gets wet in a hard rain. We've taken it up and washed it off in the yard 3 times now with no damage. Oh, and it cost less than the outdoor carpet tiles would have.
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Thanks, amigo, to you and the others who suggested a solid sheet of (outdoor) carpet. Makes a LOT of sense! I will start looking for a remainder; that Berber does sound nice. I can't say much for my pattern-making ability, but I have a smart neighbor who would help me.
***NEW QUESTION:*** My sink is set into a Salvation Army vanity table. Will it disrupt the plumbing if I lift the 4 legs up just enuff to slide in the carpet? I'd rather do that than cut around each leg.
TIA
HB
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==
Some legs have adjustable screw in/out tips. If so, just screw them in, put in the carpet and screw them out again.
==
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There are four legs in front -- two on each side -- and two plain ones in back.
I was thinking to cut off an small equal amount from each leg -- enough to pass the carpet through -- and then try to shove in some kind of metal or plastic base so they don't mar the carpet.
Is this too weird? Alternative suggestion?
TIA
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Do the legs screws into the sink at the top? Even in the "old days" they were concerned about leveling things, so there may be some adjustment in how the legs screw into the vanity.
I'd seriously *not* consider trying to cut a "small equal amount from each leg". You see that word "equal"? Ain't gonna happen.
If you can't lift it enough to get the carpet underneath, you might consider slitting the carpet so it fits *around* the legs. If it's got any kind of "fluff" you should be able to hide the slit.
BTW...I suggested making a pattern, but I did not suggest outdoor carpet. I suggested rubber backed carpet specifically made for bathrooms.
http://tinyurl.com/bath-carpet
or
http://www.bedbathstore.com/watowabacaby.html?utm_source=nextag&utm_medium=comparisonshopping&utm_term=2061-5x8
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There is no play. Legs are part of the body.

Uh.... O....kayyyyy <g>

Yes, I was thinking of that, and went to a couple of Web sites. Some of the blow-by-blow directions were exhausting just to read. Maybe my smart neighbor can explain it in doofus terms. Unless you have a simple blow-by-blow...?

There is no play . The legs are part of the body.

Uh.... O..kayyyyy <g>

May try with someone else to help. Not a one-person job.
you might consider slitting the carpet so it fits *around* the legs. If it's got

Yeah, that's what I've been thinking, but I am so un-visual that I can't visualize How To Do It. One of my neighbors can probably explain, I visited some sites that gave blow-by-blows that exhausted me just to read them. Is there an easy site? Or do you have a blow-by- blow..?

Thanks for clarification. Yes, the rubber-backed would be more easily cut.
I visited the two belolw sites at your recommendation: Madison and Mohawk. Both have attractive examples. I do feel iffy about washing such a large piece (8 ' x 4') in a machine. Too rough, even on lowest setting. I would probably take it outside, hose it off, and use that large dryer in the sky. Do-able?
HB


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"Higgs Boson" wrote derbyDad03 wrote:

Welcome! That was me.
To handle the legs, it will still be faster to use solid carpet. You do NOT want to cut them as you are making a temp fix. You put the carpet to the other wall, then use a cutting knife as it is as flush as you can get to the edges to make a half moon then you use scizzors to make the back cut and lay it flat. Finish the back end of the half moon of the carpet.
You can also get flexible soft plastic discs to put around the legs (cut at one end then put to the back so 'no-see it'.).
Keep in mind this isnt fancy but will look 'ok' for a time and not cost much. That is what you asked for. People here tend to take a basic request and turn it into a 20,000$ job very fast. It's also true some *need* that 20,000$ job and are asking for a 500$ solultion. Yours is simple. Don't muck up your washing machine with this rug. Just take it out (as needed) and hose it off if you use the true outdoor type.
Square glue down tiles of carpet 'sound' easy but actually are not. You'll have the same parts to cut out around, have something that you can't take outside and hose off, and you may find in time they glue so hard you cant even them up nor can you rip them off without breaking the underlaying tiles.
I've done both and it takes more skill to get those little squares to look right unless you do shag which is a very *bad* idea for a semi-permanent bathroom flooring that can't be hosed off. Carol
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Most feed and drain lines have enough play to just slide it under. Hard part will be lifting and sliding at the same time. Might wanna loosen up the slip nuts on the sink tailpiece while you do it.
--
aem sends...

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Yes. I tried to lift, but it wouldn't budge. So this option is a two- person job. Am still concerned about breaking something.
Might wanna loosen up the slip nuts on the sink tailpiece while you do it.
After researching , inter alia, <http://www.ehow.com / how_5581105_install-bathroom-sink-tailpiece.html> I now have a glimmer what a "tailpiece" is, thanks.
If I can find an easier way, I'd prefer, but glad to have the knowledge just in case. Tx.
HB

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This is probably not a good idea.
There are special carpet tiles made for wet areas using waterproof materials and membranes. Those can work quite well if you want a carpet-like finish. But decent ones are quite expensive so that probably won't work for you.
--
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