Carpet or Hardwood flooring?

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Just a couple adds. I use mean green with good results. I also add oxyclean, which when drying activates killing bacteria and also keeps working until dry, in cleaning. My borrowed machine works well. Hoover.
The soaps don't usually smell, and most just leave a carpet smell, regardless. You can try washing machine smelling crystals that dissolve in the mix. There was only one cleaner I used to use that smelled great. It was westlys auto cleaner, interior, which they don't make anymore, darn.
Greg
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2012 18:11:08 +0000, nestork

and on wool carpet, a once over with a bit of fabric softener in it. Gets the soap scum out fairly effectively.
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Tim Watts wrote:

I don't think it's EXACTLY peanuts. Vapor barrier material may be as low as five cents/sq ft (impregnated paper) up to, if it includes cushioning underlayment, up to $0.90/sq ft.
Note there is NO difference between a vinyl vapor barrier and 6 mil contractor trash bags. With the latter, you'll do a bit more cutting and taping. That's all.
Or you can use roofing felt, which is probably the easiest to install and pretty cheap ($0.11/sq ft from HD).
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HeyBub wrote:

If you're paying say $2/sqft for a decent laminate (Pergo say) or $4+ for engineered harwood (Kahrs), it would be really cheap to worry about 10c/sqft for a vapour barrier

Felt - that's just pikey...
But as you say, many underlays are available with inbuilt vapour barriers - it's what I used - and an underlay on concrete is a good idea unless you are going to glue the boards down - get's rid of the "hardness" of the surface and makes it much more pelasant to walk on barefoot.
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wrote:

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wrote:

12mm or thicker laminate, just the plastic waffle like used on foundation exterior to keep water away from the concrete - basically the same stuff they put on the back of the aspenite to make dri-floor.. It allows the moisture that comes up through the concrete to drain away or otherwize dissipate - which plastic sheeting does not - and it is MUCH more resistant to damage.
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We just put carpeting in the living rooms, stairs, & hall. We put laminate in the kitchen & dining. The foyer is tiled.
Just choosing carpeting is a hard choice, ended up getting it through ProSource. Instead of buying throw rugs for in front of the sink/patio door/ & in the foyer, we took the carpet to a carpet binder, had the carpet pieces sized to our liking, and had anti skid material put on the carpet. Turned out fantastic, not cheap, but wanted it to last.
If you purchase a good piece of rug, there's a huge difference from carpeting purchased for short term use or a rental.
No regrets here.
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On 11/21/2012 6:23 PM, Gordon Shumway wrote:

Dust/mite/pollen allergies? Hardwood floors. Less dusting/vacuuming desired? Hardwood floors. Cold slab or cold room underneath in a climate with significant winter weather? Carpets. Room gets noisy use or complaints of noise one floor down? Carpets. Audiophile quality system? Carpets. Usually walk around in socks or bare feet? Carpets. Incontinent pets or people? Hardwood floors. Plan to lay area rugs over the hardwood floors? You are spending more than for either choice alone and have taken on the allergy issues again. Decorating options greater with rugs than with bare hard wood floors. You also should consider how much use the room gets. If not much, the potential disadvantages of carpets are less significant. Maintenance costs depend on how likely there will be a major spill (and of what) or something or someone producing a deep scratch or gouge. A professional re-finishing of a damaged hardwood floor (sanding, re-varnishing with or without staining) can cost as much or more than replacing wall to wall carpeting (depending on the details).
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Gordon Shumway wrote:

Huh? It's no harder to walk on than the sidewalk.
In my view, laminate is preferable to carpet for many reasons. Some are: * In many instances laminate is cheaper than carpet* * Laminate is fairly easy to install for a DIY person and a fun, week-end, project * Laminate is MUCH easier to keep clean and considerably tougher to damage than carpet * By changing out the throw rugs, you can easily alter the decor of the room. Try that with purple shag!
If you do decide on laminate, check back here. We who've worked the project can provide some really useful tips. --------- * Check Lumber Liquidators and Floor & Decor Outlets for economy laminate (they've got quality stuff, too). In most cases, prices are half that of the box stores. I've seen perfectly usable laminate, say for a spare bedroom, at $0.49/sq ft.
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wrote:

Not an expert, but some people have feet trouble with hard surfaces. Usually seen the comparison applied with concrete versus dirt or turf. Horses and athletes. But when I was doing heavy factory work some guys said wood was easier on their feet/legs than concrete.
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Oren wrote:

Not very easily. Laminate - and hardwood planks - are coated with Aluminum silicate or Cobolthorium-G, I forget, but it's the same stuff used on jet fighter windshields. I've tried to damage scraps by scraping them with nails and rasps. No discernable damage. I also tried soaking the scraps in a glass of water for over a month. The amount of "swelling" or other distortion was well within the limits of my micrometer to measure (~0.001 inch)

Remember, too, that the floor, like merchandising shelves, should not be the object of the visitors' attention. In a retail environment, shoppers should be looking at the merchandise, not the shelving. Likewise in a home, a visitor's eyes should be drawn to the furnishings, wall hangings, and the naked blonde passed out on the couch, not the floor or the bare walls.

Yep. A black floor, like chartruse shag, will overpower everything in the room.
Laminate is essentially wallpaper over a dimensionally-stable base then covered with the above mentioned clear finish. As such, the variety is almost limitless. You can go wrong with basic black.
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wrote:

Tell me more about the blonde.
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Gordon Shumway wrote:

Actually, I paid her scant attention since my eyes were locked on the hideous flooring.
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Oren wrote:

You had to have been there. It was really awful.
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On Wed, 21 Nov 2012 17:23:09 -0600, Gordon Shumway

Thank you all for your replies. I'm leaning more toward wood than carpeting. Now all I have to do is convince my darling bride.
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On Thu, 22 Nov 2012 20:01:49 -0600, Gordon Shumway

It wouldn't take any convincing for mine. Some day, again.
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Gordon Shumway;2964565 Wrote: > It's time to replace our carpeting again and I was thinking about the

Wood may be slippery and can cause more accidents than carpets. That's what I think your wife is saying. With carpets you can be sure that there are no slippery floors but it is also a bit costly in terms of maintenance. - yve
--
yve lynch


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Gordon Shumway;2964565 Wrote: > It's time to replace our carpeting again and I was thinking about the

The thing with changing your flooring is that it is a big job and one that wont be done for another few years, well at least ideally. To change a floor all the furniture and room items have to be removed and stored somewhere else. Then the floor has to be fitted before everything gets moved back into place.
The mistake a lot of people make is to only think about the present problems a carpet or wood floor may make when trying to decide. However because the floor will be a permanent feature for years to come you should try and think about future problems you may face. This was our downfall.
Last year we decided to get a wooden floor from 'here' (http://www.wilmacflooring.com/flooring-wirral.php ). Anyway to cut a long story short we now have a pet dog who we love very much but I cannot say the same for the wood floor. It now looks a complete mess and has been basically transformed into a giant expensive scratch pad. We cannot afford to replace the floor again anytime soon and regret getting a wood floor. I am not saying wood floors are in anyway bad as before we got daisy (our dog) I preferred the wood floor to our carpet as it was easy to clean and gave the house a more modern and attractive image.
--
ckelly10


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