Carpentry - Molding Joints

I need some suggestions on how to join crown molding and door molding and floor molding. I don't own a fancy tool that will cut biscuits or any such thing. But when I join sections, I'd like the joint to disappear when painted.
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JimL wrote:

Proper cut, proper cut and proper cut along with a little glue and a brad or two.
Properly cut is a little art and a lot of measurement.
Get a book that covers crown and other molding and it will give you the specific instructions. Note: changing humidity and temperature are problems. Having some painters putty handy is a good idea.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Patience. Lots of patience, and a decent mitre box or powered equivalent. I find the non-electric tool to be more useful because the saw's blade is thinner, so you can make finer corrections. If you need to remove "a hair's worth" of wood, it's easier. Disclaimer: I've never used a powered mitre saw, and I'm sure there are people who can do fine surgery with them, but not me.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

It's standard procedure to shave off 1/32" or less with a chop saw. The width of the saw blade has nothing to do with the accuracy of a correction. Claimer: I use both power and hand tools, prefer hand tools, but use what works best.
R
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JimL wrote:

Since you're painting it you have lots of options. If you truly want the joint to be seamless, then you're looking at gluing the joint (polyurethane or epoxy) and then sanding and/or filling. Prime the trim and fine tune before finish painting.
R
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I guess a 45 cut on the mitre saw and then elmers wood glue after eyeballing , eh?
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wrote:

.....and don't do what I did, when I first tried cutting toe molding. I won't even go into it. Way too embarrassing.
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"JimL" wrote

Try a 22-1/2 degree. you don't get as long as cut. Also, if you're going to have to overlap, start in corner away from main entries, and finish with pieces closet to majority of traffic flow . It's commonly done with interior use and exterior use such as siding.
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dont you just love doing those crown corners?

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On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 20:27:31 GMT, "I R Baboon"

Actually, my daughter installed the crown molding in most of the house by laying it flat against the wall. But I am going to do at least one small bedroom where I have to use the coping saw, like I saw on 'This old house'.

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jiml wrote:

Well, if you're successful, and if you take your time you should be, you'll end up making your daughter's work look bad. Two-edged sword, no?
R
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I would like to address this to all of the replys above. There is not any reason that making a perfect fitting joint in any trim/crown should be a trial and error or even a coped joint. Most of the books on trim work still use the coped method. There is one book however that actually tells the beginner (and the pro) excatly how to make the perfect cut for any corner including installing crown on a sloped ceiling. Also, free online tech support is available from the book author. Visit us at www.compoundmiter.com if you would like to know exactly how to use that expensive compound miter saw as it was intended to be used.
Do-It-Yourself Crown Molding & Trim: Install It Like A PRO!
Sincerely yours Wayne Drake, President CompoundMiter, Inc.
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All they have to do is buy your $100 kit. Funny how you posted your advertisement here four times
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