Carbon Monoxide Detector

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On Tue, 22 Dec 2009 14:23:23 -0800, "Steve B"

If more than one person in a family has symptoms, that's a big warning sign.
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That's very wise thought. With colds and such, it's likely to be someone first, and the others later.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Can't you just install a new outlet like a regular person? Pick an easy place. Pretend you've got a nice cold beer like a regular person, and get the job done. Sheesh... :-)
And tell that damned choir to keep the noise down.
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Well, if you think I should. I'll saw a hole in the paneling, int he perfect place for the detector. Try to fish a wire down the wall, and find out it's got horizontal fire break. Go back to the store and buy a long installer bit, and try to drill through the firebreak. Find out my bit isn't long enough (4 foot) and go back and buy a six foot bit. Drill through the water copper, and have to take out a section of baseboard, and then paneling to fix the hole in the water copper. Light the wallboard on fire with the propane torch. Soften the flakeboard floor with the water that sprays, wehn I find out my soldering techinque wasn't doing very good. Lucky it did, put out the smouldering wall board. Nail the paneling back up, and find out I left the six foot drill bit in the bay, and now it's nailed in. No worries, got my hole. Try, in vain, to push a lenth of Romex up from the cellar to the outlet hole, with no success. Try, instead, from the top. Finally, it's about midnight and I got to be to work in the morning. Get home from work tomorrow, and find out that wife #6 has bought a battery monoxide detector, and put it over the outlet hole, and finished nailing up the panneling. She greets me with a pan of home baked brownies, and all my 7 wives and 32 children tell me what a good job I did.
Sorry about the choir. My 4th teenage daughter is going through a phase.
--
Christopher A. Young
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A normal installation, in other words. I don't see the problem.
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I'll get right on it! (fire extinguisher optional)
--
Christopher A. Young
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Is there anyplace in the house where surface mounted wire channel would not look weird? That's an easy way to add an outlet.
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The whole house looks a bit strange, so wire mold is on topic any where.
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Christopher A. Young
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IIRC, they are a little spendy, too.
Steve
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I have a First Alert model FCD3N. It uses a 9 vote battery which I had to change yesterday for the first time since I bought it about 3 years ago. (it started beeping)
Freckles
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

The American Lung Association (or one of its local units) used to recommend http://www.coexperts.com/2004brochure.pdf This unit displays and alarms at lower CO levels than other CO alarms. It is not UL listed because of the low alarm levels. I think the idea is that at low, but "safe", levels there can be many false alarms to fire departments. The manufacturer takes a different view, backed by occupational regulatory standards. It probably does not meet requirements to have a CO detector if you are required to have one. It may be particularly useful if you have a 'lung condition'. It is relatively expensive.
When I was looking for a CO detector I read that Nighthawk sensor elements were the best. I believe they are only available in Kiddie detectors.
I bought a Kiddie Model KN-COPP-3. It will display CO levels starting at 30 ppm but when the "recall" button is pressed it will display past exposure down to 11 ppm. It was the only one I found (except for coexperts) that displayed below 30 ppm.
I think they all alarm rapidly at very high CO levels and take a long time to alarm (by design) at low levels.
The CO sensor elements may die after about 9 years. I believe the one I bought becomes obnoxious at that time so you have to replace it.
Some alarms include combustible gas detection (CO is a combustible gas).
--
bud--


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Kewl! Kidde is the brand that Home Depot had. We're in good company. Like smoke detectors, they are no longer functional after some years. Seems like the CO detector is good for 10 years, and the furnace is good for 20.
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Christopher A. Young
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I was in Home Depot today, buying a couple parts. Walked past the smoke detectors. One from Kidde was under $20, and takes three AA cells. First set of batteries included. So, I bought it.
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In my case, my only source of CO would be the oil furnace**, and if the electric power goes out, the furnace will stop running, so I can use an AC powered detector.
**Or the house fire downstairs, but the smoke detector should notice that! :)
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Years ago we had a first alert and it went off, so I called the fire department and they were there instantly, and in force, with their own detectors that found no problem. I was talking to the Captain and said it was a bit embarrassing to have all those trucks in the street and asked what I could do to prevent another false reading. He suggested getting a Nighthawk to replace the first alert.
The Nighthawk I found was the powered model (I don't know if they make a battery model) so I bought it and plugged it in. I like it because it gives a constant reading, even though it is negative, as that makes me think the thing is still working. Its worked well for many years now. Perhaps first alert has improved their product over the years, but I'm still happy with my Nighthawk. I don't trust battery models as I travel a lot and might not be home when the battery chirps to death, and checking for the flashing light is too easy to forget.
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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I like my Nighthawks. I use one in the utility room, kitchen, attic, hallway. The one in the kitchen goes off the most and reminds us to use the exhaust fan while cooking. On occasion it gives a "10" reading, too low to set off the alarm. The Nighthawks chirp whenever we lose power (about 10 times a year), but they still operate on a 9V batt when there is no power.
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 19:32:39 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

The Nighthawk is a good one. It has battery backup and continuous display. You will need somewhere to plug in the adapter.
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