carbon filter for water filter


We have a strong smell in hot and cold water. All kinds of tests can't identify the smell. Someone suggested a carbon filter will help. Does anyone know anything about carbon filters and could help me of whether they are a good product to have or not ? Do they build up alot of germs in the filter? Thanks.
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wrote:

Reverse Osmosis systems can/will smell like rotten eggs - replace filters.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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I use carbon filters for drinking water. We get some swampy odor at times from the town water. Sure makes a huge difference in taste. As good as any bottled stuff. I use a whole house type filter with the large cartridge, but you can try out one of the sink faucet jobs to see how it works for you. I don't filter all the water, just for drinking/cooking in the kitchen and refrigerator.
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car crash wrote:

I'm curious about your "all kinds of tests" - have you acutally had this tested by a lab, or by 'tests', do you mean you've held it up next to gasoline and decided it doesn't smell like that? A carbon filter would probably help, but not guaranteed - if your problem is some organic compound, carbon should definitely help. I don't think there are any drawbacks to carbon filters, as long as you change them roughly to keep up with the manufacturer's recommendations. We have a carbon filter mounted on our kitchen sink, and though it says to change every 3 months, we sometimes get 4, but it's starting to get scummy and slows down at that point and I wouldn't want to go any longer. Our water is pretty good to begin with, but it helps some with taste and makes my wife feel better by reducing tasteless pollutants like atrazine. As far as "germs", some bacteria and/or fungi can eventually start to grow on the filter, but as long as you change the filter semi-regularly (depends on size of filter), you should definitely be filtering out more than you're adding. One quick test you could do is to get or borrow a Brita-type pitcher filter - that's just a small carbon filter. If that helps, you could keep it, move up to a faucet-mount, an under-sink mount, or a whole-house filter if you want to filter shower water too. If you do a lot of lawn watering, you might want to check into a bypass valve, or installing the filter after the hose spigots, so you're not wasting your filtered water on your lawn. Good luck, Andy
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By all kinds of tests, I mean lab tests. All came back negative. No one can recognize the smell but the concensus is that its an organic smell. The water company offered to install a $500 large block carbon filter. Is that decent price?
On Nov 22, 9:44 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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