car stereo

Page 1 of 2  
i was wondering if there was anyway possible to take a car stereo system and inbed it into lets say a wall and hook it up to speakers and everything but run it off of the electrical outlet in the house? what would i need to rig up so that i could avoid the whole car battery set up which would need a constant charging that would build up hydrogen gas and pose as a potential fire hazzard? if any of that made sense, i appreciate your help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

12v power supply from Radio Shack or wherever. Be aware most power supplies are 'dirty', so it will sound pretty staticy. Also be aware the sound from most car stereos is designed around small spaces and small speakers, so in a normal size room, it is likely to sound pretty crappy. Make sure the ohm rating of the speakers you use is appropriate.
All in all, cheaper and easier to buy a good boom box.
aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16 May 2007 18:20:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Use an old PC supply. They are cheap and have plenty of power to drive a car stereo, even a big one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16 May 2007 18:20:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you are doing this to get stations you can't get on your AC radios, I"m told it won't work. I'm told car radios get such good reception because of the car itself, maybe because it forms a ground plane around the base of the antenna.
If that is true, how well do the radios in Saturns work? They have all plastic bodies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A 13.8v base station power supply such as you would use for powering a mobile CB radio indoors, is all that's needed. You can also safely use a 12v battery, by using a sealed gel-type, such as is found as the backup supply in alarm panels and emergency lighting. I'm not sure that the groundplane argument holds up. On vehicles where the antenna is wing mounted, the groundplane is very lop-sided. Also, vehicle antennas tend to be electrically short for the frequencies concerned, and don't contain anything in the way of loading coils to address this, so end up being pretty inefficient things.
Arfa
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Many have head amps these days. Mine - I have a DAB radio - two, one for VHF band III and one for VHF Band II & AM.
--
*Remember, no-one is listening until you fart.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 May 2007 08:09:03 GMT, "Arfa Daily"

Realize that the antenna is a relatively tuned device, which makes it more difficult to connect it ot a standard FM antenna. Other than that possible problem (which may not affect your installation at all) then Arfa's suggestion of a CB adapter is a good one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I live in Baltimore and there have been both AM and FM stations in WAshington which came in fine in my car, on two different radios of the same style, and on my friend's car radio.
But badly if at all in the house. Over the years I've tried 10 or more table radios and 2 stereo tuners, some pretty expensive. One AM radio station WRC never came in at all in the house, and WAMU and WCSP will come in somehwat on some radios and won't at all on others (and price doesn't seem to matter. Some of the cheapest work the best)
I wanted to take one of the car radios and build a cabinet for it, to hold it and the battery, and a small charger, but a friend who has worked in electronics said it wouldn't work as well in the house. Do you all think it would?
If you are inclined to email me for some reason, remove NOPSAM :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It will depend on the type of building you are in - car aerials are usually in the open. ;-)
But as said before - no need for a battery and charger unless you suffer from power cuts. You can buy mains power units designed for this purpose from RS etc.
--
*On the other hand, you have different fingers*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 May 2007 18:46:05 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I did install a folded dipole in the attic and connect a radio to that. The only AM station I really wanted to get has changed frequencies and is now so weak I can't get it in the car either. It changed formats too so I don't even want it now.
Both stations I really want are PBS or C-Span, in other words, talk, so sound quality isn't important as long as it is clear.
The house is a wood frame townhouse. Which of the following would weaken the signal?
The roof is plywood covered by "tarpaper" which looks and feels like black paper, covered by asphalt shingles.
There are electric wires to ceiling lights in 5 places, most of which are off most of the time, and certainly could be if it helped reception.
Sheetrock walls, covering wood frame with fiberglass insulation, with T-111 (a wood product) on the outside of the first floor, bricks on the outside of the second floor. The radio stations are south of me, and the south side of my house has a medium sized aluminum framed window which is made up of 3 smaller aluminmum framed pieces of glass and 3 storm windows, and one vinyl bug-screen, with aluminum frame. Barely any electric wires in the south facing wall, and all can be off.
Holding up the second floor are probably two steel I-beams, the width of the house, spaced at thirds from the front of the house to the back.
Holding up the first floor are also two steel I-beams, but I don't expect to get good reception in the basement.
So how much worse is an aerial in the house than outside?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The AM aerial I have here in the UK covers LW, MW and SW and is an externally mounted vertical rod about 4 metres long with a type of balun on the end. The cable is a twin screened balanced type - a special for those frequencies. At the other end is a second transformer that does balanced to unbalanced to feed a tuner. The principle is that most interference at these frequencies radiates horizontally, so you put the aerial above it and have a well screened downlead. Not a cheap device but it works well and is a one time purchase.
If you only need the one station, I'd consider mounting the receiver in your attic so the aerial is close and in a good position and radio link it to the other(s) in the house.
--
*Real men don\'t waste their hormones growing hair

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Is a rooftop antenna out of the question?
What I'd do is lug a car battery into your livingroom, hook up the car radio and see if it works. Probably take less time than all the typing you've already done.
Bear in mind that most car stereos are designed to drive 4-ohm car speakers not 8-ohm home speakers... for long-term life of the car unit you may want to use the line-out function if it has one into your home amp.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A solid state amp won't come to any harm driving a higher impedance speaker than the minimum recommended. You'll just get less power. Bridged output car amps ain't at the leading edge of Hi-Fi though, so even a budget home one will probably sound better.
--
*Stable Relationships Are For Horses.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need a better antenna, not a different radio. Can you mount a whip on the house? Radio Shack used to sell a suitable model.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 May 2007 17:53:39 GMT, "Homer J Simpson"

I can do that, but I liked the idea of portable so that I could use it in the bedroom, office, and kitchen. I spend a lot of time in each place. I could run an extension to each place -- I wish I had done this when I ran phone anc vcr lines. I don't have quite the energy now I used to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There was a device called an active antenna - there were construction projects for these. Try google.
http://www.southgatearc.org/qrp/activeantenna.htm is one such.
The other way is a honking big tuneable loop antenna - but that's not too portable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 May 2007 00:00:48 GMT, "Homer J Simpson"

You folks are getting way too complicated. You can just strip about a half inch of a 3 foot 12ga solid wire, bend it over at a right angle so you still have about 1/8" of insulation in the bend and shove it in the antenna hole. Hook that up top an old PC supply and rock on. I have a radio in my shop set up that way and it works fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 May 2007 00:30:28 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

How's your AM reception? 8^)
CWM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

About like it is in my car. We really only have 2 AM stations here and one is en espanol
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

wire that comes to hand, and get perfectly good stereo results on FM, and good reception on AM, so I don't see why you shouldn't get good results with a decent antenna outside. At the end of the day, apart from the ones with built in amps, as Dave pointed out, car antennas are just an electrically short metal rod at worst, and a crude untuned helical wound on fibreglass at best. Just one thing though. If you went for a genuine car antenna, and needed to extend the cable over the length that it's supplied with, you need to use a genuine ready made up extension for the job. Extending with any old coax that comes to hand, for some reason, just doesn't work, as I found out a few years back ...
Arfa
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.