Car hiitches easy to install!!! except

Page 1 of 3  
I was amazed to learn this week that a lot of passenger cars not only have the holes drilled in the frame to attach a hitch, but they even have nuts welded on the top of the holes so that one can just bolt the hitch on.**
However the nut threads are often clogged with dirt and rust.
Rather than hunt for thread chaser for this particular metric size, and rather than buying a whole set of metric taps, I thought I could make my own thread chaser by buying a bolt the right size and grinding a couple grooves up from the end of the bolt maybe 3/4" long.
Do you think this will work? It sounds quicker and easier than shopping for something I will use for only 4 or 6 holes total.
The car is 11 years old and was in Florida or South Carolina almost all its life. Probably not as rusty as some cars.
**I think that's amazing. This accounts for why they keep saying the hitch can be attached in 30 minutes, more or less, and why those making comments said they were able to do it in 30 minutes. .
I also think it's amazing that they go to so much trouble for something most people never use, and don't even know about. For example, I've read the owner's manual for the 2000 Solara convertible I just bought and it discusses towning, but afaict says nothing about mounting the hitch or how easy it will be. (It actually discourages towing.)
Are they being paid by the hitch companies to drill these holes and weld these nuts? After all, I think less than 5 percent of passenger cars will ever have a hitch attached, expecially if you don't count SUV's. And in some cases, he nuts are welded into a square tube. Even if a robot does the welding, it must take a few minutes to weld on both the side near the end of the tube and the other side too. Or do they just weld the left and right sides?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/20/2011 11:33 AM, micky wrote: ...

Can't imagine how going to the closest auto parts or hardware and buying a tap could be classified as "hard", but...
Sure the proposal will work; a stud will work w/o the modifications, too.
If there is mud, etc., in the location just start w/ the pressure nozzle on a garden hose and anything suitable to poke the bulk of the dirt out. A small diameter brush can then take most of the rest of the actual bulk material out and then a shot of lubricant and away ya' goes...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Your average tap has a hardness of about 62 Rockwell, that bolt is probably in the mid 20s, the frame probably right around 20. I think you'll see significant deformation of the threads on the bolt if you try to use it as a tap. Think about what a bolt looks like when it gets cross-threaded. It doesn't do too good of a job of cutting when that happens either.
You can buy taps one at a time. They're usually less than $5 for the sizes you're looking at. Use with oil or tap magic.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CraigT wrote:

What this guy said. Pressure blast the nuts, flood them with a water displacement compound, then use the appropriate chaser to clean them out if you need to.
When you attach the hitch, use loctite on the threads, and torque the fasteners to the proper torque, taking into consideration the reducing factor when using a thread compound.
Remember, this is a hitch, and if something comes loose at highway speeds it won't be pretty.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/20/2011 12:40 PM, CraigT wrote:

Nonsense--the threads are already tapped, all he'll be doing is cleaning out a little (probably very little) dirt...
It would be at least a Grade 5 recommended bolt; it'll be plenty hard enough to not deform enough't you'd measure it...
A tap would be fine, sure, but for the purpose there's nothing really to be gained much; other than he'll have to go get the bolts anyway so may'st as well while there...
But, there's surely nothing bad to happen to simply clean out a set of threads w/ the fastener unless they're so badly corroded as to be to the point one wouldn't want to use the resulting set of threads for anything important any way, tap or no tap.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was thinking that if the bolt is 20 as you say, and I'm sure you're right, it might be harder than the rust and dirt. I don't want to rethread the frame itself, just clean out the rust and dirt.

That's pretty cheap, I'll admit.
I have a tendency to think everything I've never bought before is very expensive. When I first bought some lucite, I was amazed that the piece I wanted was only a dollar!

Also a good idea. Maybe I panicked because of one guy who complained there was no tap included with the hitch. .

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep BTDT with my Impala 5-6 years ago. I was surprised, too-- and luckily everything was still workable even after 5 years of NY winters.

Sounds harder- and may not be as fast as using the right tool. but it will be cheaper & it *might* work.
-snip-

I wouldn't get too carried away with what you're towing with it then. My Impala is only rated for 1000 pounds total. [maybe 100 pounds tongue weight?]
At about 1200 pounds the car gets a little sloppy and I wouldn't want to do an interstate with it. [My math was off one day & put 4000 pounds of blocks in the trailer. I knew it was overloaded as soon as I started, but after seeing that the transmission and brakes were up to the job, I decided to go for the 10 miles home. It was a slow trip that reminded me of riding in a boat.]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The manual is schizophrenic.
"Your vehicle is disgined primarily as a pasenger carrying vehicle Towing a trailer will have an adverse effect on handling, performance, baraking, durability and driving economy. Your safety and satisfaction depend on the proper use of correct equipment with cautious driving habits. For our safety and and the safety of others you must not overload your hehicle or trailer. Toyota warrantees do not applay to damage for malfuncition caused by towing a trailer for commercial purposes. Ask your local toyoata dealer for further details efore towing. " Then it has 4 more pages on how to tow, including 1.,5 pages of warnings (the whole manaul is full of warnings. If I were 16 y.o. I'd be scared to drive it.) . They say it can tle 2000 pounds, which is likely more than I can load on t he trailer.
"Never tap into your vehicles brake hydraulic system... " Who's going to do that!!!

LOL. I was t told that one never needed math after he got out of school So I wouldn't begin to get it right.

LOL. A lot can be accomplished by driving slow.
When I had a full size convertible, on two occasions,I bought and delivered a spinet piano. Put a double bed mattress on top of the folded to and the trunk lid, and the piano on top of that. Drove 10 mph, 20 maybe if the street ahead looked very smooth, 5 mph if it looked rought. You're not supposed to move an upright piano on its back (or a grand piano except on its side) to avoid breaking the sound board, but when the bumps can barely be recognized even by me, there's not much risk.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Used to be the only way to get trailer brakes. All the brake controllers were hydraulic over electric.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Aug 2011 19:57:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Wow. I guess that fully explains their warning, but it sounds awfully hard to do, both at the car end and the trailer end.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

When I was pulling 7000 lbs fiver with 3/4 ton Ford F-250HD Towing special, trailer brake was tied into truck brake hydraulic line. After making proper adjustment it worked without any problem. Also I could override controller manually. Maybe it has something to do ABS brakes. As long as you know what you are doing. All passenger cars are uni-body structure and you can't haul anything real heavy. Unless it's equipped with heavier suspension, cooling, etc. On some cars you can have tow package option. My Acura MDX is rated for 3500 lbs with proper equipment but I wouldn't dare to pull full load for long haul.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

those days), install a "T" and run the line to the controller. The controller sent a varying current to the brakes, propoertional to brake pressure. Trailer end was the same as today. I installed dozens - possibly hundreds of them over the years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Aug 2011 21:32:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I think the Toyoat manual was talking about something else. It said it "would lower the braking effectiveness" which to me meant using the hydraulic pressure of the car to apply the brakes of the trailer. Which means running a hydraulic line from the car to the trailer!
Just using the pressure to run the controller a few inches away wouldn't hurt braking effectiveness at all, would it? I assume the line to the controller was bled. .
So now I've changed my mind and it still sounds alarmist by Toyota.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

hydraulic/electric systems are NOT RECOMMENDED on dual braking systems - much-less anti-lock. ANd Toyota is not speaking of a different system. I used to be a Toyota Service Manager, back when dual diaganol braking systems, and dual circuit systems in general, first came into use. At the same time, electronic brake controllers became REQUIRED.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

Trailer surge brake is self contained.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

pretty common in Brit-Land.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/21/2011 6:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't like surge brakes. No manual control from the drivers seat for different situations. Thinking of it, do they have a bypass so you can back up a hill?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 10:18:43 -0400, Tony Miklos

operate it) - could rig an electric over-ride connected to back-up lights.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

would not be a good idea on anti-lock systems. As far as I know it is not legal to use them on current vehicles - DEFINITELY NOT RECOMMENDEED - which is the point of the warning.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It would be today with all the anti-lock and dual master cylinder. Years ago, it was just cutting, flaring, adding fittings. Well within the abilities of the old shade tree mechanics.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.