Car generator to power house

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On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 05:03:57 -0800 (PST), ransley

The TRACTION battery - not the 12 volt accessory battery. READ and THINK
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On Dec 29, 3:05 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Point is it restarts automaticly to recharge when on, your not auto restart statement will mislead.
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 16:52:43 -0800 (PST), ransley

It reads the TRACTION battery voltage for the restart. The 12 volt battery is NOT the traction battery.
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On Dec 29, 9:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If you put a load on the 12v lead battery with car off the traction battery keeps it charged till the traction battery needs charging.
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 06:04:45 -0800 (PST), ransley

So the 12 volt battery is charged by a dc-dc converter? That WOULD make a difference.
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On Dec 29, 4:05 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Help me out here. How exactly then does the 12V battery get recharged? One would think it would be tied into and be recharged via the main battery. It would seem pretty stupid to have a design where the 12 volt battery could be exhausted and not recharged from the main battery. Also, if this 12V battery is used to start the car, then not recharging it via the main battery could leave you stranded with a car that won't start, but has a fully charged huge main battery battery. That doesn't seem right.
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On Dec 30, 6:48 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It does auto restart when key is set to on, and everything is recharged when low but the traction battery triggers the motor, then it shuts off by itself. I bet the motor starter battery is never let to go below 12.8 when running and charges to about 13.3, just as your car does it. The 12v lead acid only starts the little 4 cil motor. Its my logical guess and I bet its right.
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 05:49:49 -0800 (PST), ransley

I did more sesearch.
There is NO 12 volt alternator charging system. There is a DC converter that runs off the traction battery to supply the 12 volt loads (and charge the somewhat redundant 12 volt battery). The engine starts of the high voltage traction pack, ( there is NO starter motor) and it is only allowed to drop either 40% or to 40% charge (information is contradictory) so the vehicle always has enough powe to restart. The 12 volt conveerter does not run unless the "ignition" is turned on - so the 12 volt battery is required to operate interior lights etc when the "key" is turned off.
It would be impossible to run a larger inverter off the 12 volt battery than the 1000 VA unit he apparently was using.
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On Dec 30, 9:32 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not impossible, im trying to learn also at altautos toyota prius, it is done and one guy there even has a hard wired inverter and 120v socket. If the traction battery keeps the 12v charged then why not, What I read of the article by his usage and what I have in apliances tested by a Kill-a -watt, 1000 watts may never been needed, my 19.5 cu ft frige pulls about 110 w, 450 surge.
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 04:48:22 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The 12 volt battery does not start the engine. If they are using a dc-dc converter they hardly need a 12 volt battery. Sure don't need a large one.
The iDc converter portion of the inverter drive pack is apparently good for a maximum of 100 amps so the battery "protects" the converter if a short power surge of over 100 amps is required
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Another good reason to own a hybrid, that system is made to make electricity.
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ransley wrote:

There are no good reasons to own a hybrid.
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fiancial probably not.
however some prius owners are adding some equiptement to charge the battery pack at home from the power line.
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wrote:

My brother gets to drive solo in the carpool lane in his.
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What do you drive, a 8mpg, 4wd expedition, Wasting money to drive is not money you keep or enjoy. Do you agree with giving 700 Billion a year to our Arab enemies to move our vehicles. Hybrid is one good alternative, but until the Gov subsides them they are high priced. 700 Billion we could have bought everyone in the world an Iphone, or paid for insurance, fix our infrastructure, or pay for enough solar to make a big difference here.
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ransley wrote:

Agreed. I once had a car that got NINE miles to the gallon! It was a Ford Custom 500 - with a 426 Interceptor engine, 4bbl carb, etc. God, I loved that car.

Rest easy. We don't. We get about 15% of our imported oil from the Arab lands. Most imported oil comes from our Canadian enemies (25%) and a goodly bit from our Mexican enemies (13%). We also get a surprising amount from our Nigerian enemies (10%).

No matter what is done, solar can never make even a tiny difference, let alone a big one.
Had we spent the $700 billion as you suggest, we could talk to everyone on the planet as we pedaled our bikes. That would be nice.
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wrote:

Gotta remember it's CNG - Compressed. Not a liquid fuel. Refueling is slow and complex. No "self serve" CNG stations.
Fuel density is also low.
Kitchener/Waterloo had a fleet of CNG bussed (converted deisel engines) and operating cost was over double the diesel cost. They just retired the whole fleet.
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ransley wrote:

It's the physics. Sunshine dumps about 735 watts/sq meter on the earth's surface. At noon. On the equator. With no clouds. I haven't figured it for Germany, but, adjusting for latitude, hours of daylight, percentage of clound cover, and the like, and assuming a 50% efficiency rate for whatever solar collector methodology in use, it would take a solar collecting array the size of the Los Angeles basin (~1400 sq miles) to provide enough energy for California (~50GW).
That's after it gets going. 1400 square miles is almost three times greater than the size of the interstate highway system; it'll take a while to get it built.
The only way to increase the 735 watt business is to move the orbit of the earth closer to the sun.
Don't get me wrong - sunbeams can help. Solar water heating is a plus and there are even entire houses that are 'solar powered.' But that's small mice. One Aluminum smelting plant uses more electricity than a million homes. The New York City subway system uses, by itself, almost as much electricity as all the residences in Manhattan!
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HeyBub wrote:

You've noticed why solar energy will never be practical in a centralized utility generation model. To be of any benefit, solar PV (and solar thermal for heat and HW), have to use existing roof space on every home i.e. the distributed generation model.
Ultimately since most renewable energy sources are intermittent generation and the grid simply can't handle shifting that much distributed generated power to track time zones and whatnot, there will need to be some amount of local storage i.e. batteries at each home to help fill in the generation gaps.
The technology is about at the point where this is workable, but the economics aren't there yet for a variety of reasons. I expect ultimately the solution will need to be utility installed and maintained RE generation systems at customers homes, primarily solar PV, but wind as well in suitable areas. I expect it will be PV panels on the roof and a standardized battery/inverter package the size of a typical A/C condenser or pad mount transformer outside the home so the utility can access it for service when it calls home with a problem.
This distributed generation model won't eliminate the need for utility scale generation, but it could sure put a dent in it as well as reduce some demand on the aging and badly in need of upgrading "grid".
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Or we could just screw all that and build nukes now. It's worked for France, where they get 70%+ of their electric power from it. No big Pickens plan. No need to convert cars to NG, or put up economically unviable systems at everyone's homes. Yeah, it ain't perfect, but then it's proven, available, competitive and an easy immediate solution.
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