Capacity of gas meter?

I am thinking about installing a natural gas electric generator. It uses 100cf/hour. That is about the same as my furnace and water heater combined.
Will my supply have the capacity? How can I tell? The genny and furnace will pretty much have to be run together.
Thanks.
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Toller wrote:

There are dozens of different size meters; ask gas utility.
But.....more important, you have to do the calcs for capacity related to the piping sizes, especially if the gen is tapped off the gas line some distance from the meter. The gas flow to the gen could wind up robbing the furnace of its necessary line pressure.
Jim
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Thanks, I will.

No, I haven't. I was going to replace the elbow next to the meter with a T and take it there. Quite honestly I have no idea how to do a capacity calculation, but if my supply is adequate, then the piping shouldn't be a problem done that way, should it?

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You can do a web search to find what size pipes you need for the required natural gas flow rate. The pipe size depends on pipe length. Here is a URL that seems useful:
http://www.aprsupply.com/aprtech14.htm
Many homes have a 1" or 1.25" gas service. If you tee into this big pipe and split into two 3/4" pipes, you'll probably just barely have the flow you need. But I'm making assumptions about how long your pipe runs are. One inch pipes coming out of the tee should handle just about any reasonable pipe length.
Also need to ask your gas provider about how much total flow your line can support. A 1.25" line won't be enough if it is well over 100' to the street main pipe. A 1" pipe to the street will poop out around 50 feet if your maximum demand is 200 cf/hr.
-- Mark Kent, WA
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Hopefully the gen installation instructions will specify the pipe diameter vs length that you will need. This assumes you tap it directly at the meter, or at least within a few inches. Once the pipe goes through reducers, elbows, and valves, restrictions start to have an effect on the gas supply to the generator.
Around here, the smallest gas meter is good for about 250 cf/hr. With the generator only using about 100 of that, I doubt you'll be running all your gas appliances during a power outage, so the existing capacity will most likely be adequate. The gas company will be able to tell you for sure, if you can get through to the right department. The meter should have its capacity stamped on it somewhere.
My NG genset requires up to 240 cf/hr, so I had to go with a larger meter to cover the times when the heating system was running along with the generator. Hasn't happened yet, though.
Good luck. Bob M.

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Toller,
Have you asked your gas supplier?
Dave M.
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Toller,
Have you asked your gas supplier?
Dave M.
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you a larger meter if you are going to buy more gas! They should also give you some free advice on your plans.
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This is turtle.
First call your gas supplier and say " i need to start burning a lot more natural gas at my home and would you come see How much more i need and maybe install a free new meter. then hang up the phone and walk out your back door and head for the gas meter. the gas supplier will meet you there in about 2 minutes. The gas meter changing crew will arrive in about 30 minutes.
Now do you need something else ?
TURTLE
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