Can you run a generator in a basement with the windows open?

Page 4 of 6  


You've already seen it, but I wonder... Somebody wrote that most of the mechanical parts that wear in an EU1000 can be replaced with a $129 cylinder assembly. Is the EU2000 also like that?
Article 106218 of alt.energy.homepower: From: snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu Newsgroups: alt.home.repair,alt.energy.homepower Subject: Re: Honda eu 2000 Generator Date: 7 Dec 2005 07:44:20 -0500 Organization: Villanova University
With a 125K Btu/gallon high heating value and a 10,000 hour engine lifetime, Honda EU2000 cogen looks less economical: if we burn 1.08 gallons of gasoline with a fuel value of 135K Btu in 4 hours at the 1600 W rated load and make 6.4 kWh (21.8K Btu) of electricity and 113.2K Btu of heat (another 33.2 kWh, ie 39.6 kWh total) and the heat replaces electric resistance and the Honda costs $899 (mayberrys.com) and wear adds $0.09/h, ie 5.6 cents/kWh, this kind of cogen only seems to make sense at an off-road gas price of $1.75/gallon if electricity costs more than 100x$1.75/39.6+5.6 = 10.7 cents/kWh.
Nick
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Yeah, Nick was way off but I come up with less than what you got. An error in my calculations?
Using Nick's 1.08 gallons for a 4 hour run at 1.6KW
That is, .27 gallons per hour at $2.25 would be 60.75 cents for 1.6KW.
That would be 38 cents for a KW hour.
$899 depreciated over 4000 hours = 22.5 cents.
Total = 60.5 cents per hour + oil changes. (and everything works according to specification).
Hmm, looks like a little problem of a slipped decimal point using that number.
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Would you have any evidence for this article of faith?
Nick
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wrote:

Yes, Faith in Newton. Not in you.
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This is funny, nicks mythical magical 5.9 cent kwh. and he has no numbers
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He says you gotta have faith!! Obviously never took a physics course where you have to prove your work - just an answer is not adequate even if it is correct.
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You've seen 'em twice now.
Nick
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Nick. Nobody has seen anything but your dreaming of your "Dream machine " making juice at 5.9c kwh
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wrote:

You have seen my calculations twice showing that it would be at least 60 cent per kwh but you never showed how you arrived at your numbers.
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Wrong. For the third time:
Article 106218 of alt.energy.homepower: From: snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu Newsgroups: alt.home.repair,alt.energy.homepower Subject: Re: Honda eu 2000 Generator Date: 7 Dec 2005 07:44:20 -0500 Organization: Villanova University
With a 125K Btu/gallon high heating value and a 10,000 hour engine lifetime, Honda EU2000 cogen looks less economical: if we burn 1.08 gallons of gasoline with a fuel value of 135K Btu in 4 hours at the 1600 W rated load and make 6.4 kWh (21.8K Btu) of electricity and 113.2K Btu of heat (another 33.2 kWh, ie 39.6 kWh total) and the heat replaces electric resistance and the Honda costs $899 (mayberrys.com) and wear adds $0.09/h, ie 5.6 cents/kWh, this kind of cogen only seems to make sense at an off-road gas price of $1.75/gallon if electricity costs more than 100x$1.75/39.6+5.6 = 10.7 cents/kWh.
Nick
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lifetime,
gasoline
kWh,
kind
if
Ah, so you are referring to a post in a completely different thread on a different subject and including the heat as being useful.
It would have helped if you had made a reference.
We don't want the heat, only the 6.4 kWh of electricty.
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Wasting 84% of the fuel's heating value is your choice.
Nick
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wrote:

We do it all the time with all our vehicles and power plants. You kept saying you were going to produce electricity at that price.
Heat is hardly something we want when the outside temperature is in the 90s!! Read the Subject line. He is not asking for heat.
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A BAD choice :-)

Wrong.
Nick
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At 3600 rpm full operating load 1600w the EU 2000 does not last 10000 hrs. The EU is load RPM dependant. At under 700w output it turns near 1800 rpm giving it a average 10000 hr life span. People using the gen conservativly averaging 3- 800 watts experiance up to 15000 hrs, but not at full rated load of 3600 rpm 1600 watts. At extreme low load on constant operation of 900 rpm unit life can be easily a minimum of 50000 hrs. Use-Load-Rpm are your criteria to determine unit life.
$0.059c kwh is still your dream. If it were true Nobody would consider a utility co. Everyone , every county would be off grid. Im .125 kwh soon going to .135kwh. If I could do it for $0.059cent kwh with an EU, I would be rich selling power to everyone and anyone
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Did you look at how he comes up with the 5.9c? What I see that he is saying is that the Generator puts out 6.4 kWH in 4 hours which can be converted to 21.8K BTU. The generator itself puts out 113.2 kWH of heat. It takes 33.2 kWH of electricity to create that much heat. Therefore the generator is putting out the equivalent of 6.4 + 33.2 = 39.6 kWh. It's 100% efficient (creating heat but not electricity)!! So even using his low price of $1.75 a gallon, the electricity still costs at least 31.5c per kWH.
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Would you have any evidencde fot this article of faith? :-)
Nick
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Wow I had no idea they could last even 1/4 as long as those numbers you're throwing out there. 50K Hrs at idle speed still seems like a heck of a ot for a small engine.
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Nick wake the F up, 10000 hrs at 3600 rpm full load throttle is like taking a honda car running it on a race track at apx 130 mph , motors dont last at high rpm full load. At that load and rpm the Honda car would last if you are real real lucky 1000 hrs, do you thing the EU has some "magic" motor Honda wont put in a car, Get it long life users run light loads, lower rpm. And your electric costs for an EU, totaly bull crap, unrealistic stupidity.
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Not correct. CO mixes quite well with breathable air. It's propane pools along the floor.
It's generally deadly mistake to put anything that that generates CO in a closed space without having thought-out and well-designed ventilation in place FIRST. Most portable generators are not designed for indoor use. LISTEN to that advice.
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