Can You Paint Paneling?

I have a room that was added on to the house that I bought and they used that hideous pine (?) color paneling that was usually found in the older mobile homes for the walls.
I'm on a VERY limited budget and I need to do something to this room temporarily before I use it.
Can I paint it a different color just to make it look half way decent until I can afford to drywall it?
If so, just regular interior paint?
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Yes might take several coats depending on the porousness of the product. Use a large nap roller. My exwife painted my pecan paneling white with mommies help. Notice I said ex wife. The paneling cost 70 bucks a sheet wholesale.
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Yes, you can paint over paneling. If you have a real shiny finish on the paneling some people recommend roughing it up a little with some sandpaper. However, being averse to too much work, I've had good luck bypassing the sanding and using a quality primer (such as B-I-N) and then some latex paint. Of course, it's never going to look like freshly painted sheetrock, but I've found it to be a great improvement. What were people thinking back in the '70's when they installed this stuff?
Tom

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On Mon, 5 Apr 2004 18:49:16 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron) wrote:

Yes. My parents did this with theirs with excellent results: you need to sand it thoroughly to remove the shiny finish, then prime it, then coat it with regular interior paint.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron) wrote in message

Yes

Yes
The paneling needs a good cleaning first. If it is several years old, it should then be ready to paint. If it is newer paneling that still has a gloss to it, it should be lightly sanded first. I did mine many years ago and the paint has held up really well.
Bob S.
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I have that type of paneling in our den and I skim coated it with sheet rock mud first, then painted it. It looks pretty good and you can't tell it's not drywall unless you look real close. Catt.
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Oil based primer is the key, unless you really enjoy sanding.
I had pretty good luck covering up the grooves with a dense spackling product, then sanding it down ever-so-carefully. It took alot of time, and it was only a ten foot long wall, but you'd never know it was ever paneled.
Mr Fixit eh
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Hi Ron!
R > I have a room that was added on to the house that I bought and they used R > that hideous pine (?) color paneling that was usually found in the older R > mobile homes for the walls. R > R > I'm on a VERY limited budget and I need to do something to this room R > temporarily before I use it. R > R > Can I paint it a different color just to make it look half way decent R > until I can afford to drywall it? R > R > If so, just regular interior paint?
Yes, though I would gently sand the surface to roughen it ever so slightly to allow the paint to adhere better. After sanding rinse with a detergent to remove the sanding dust and household greases. (TSP comes to mind but not sure if that's available still -- haven't had to buy any in years.)
Be sure to get the recesses in the panelling. If a distressed surface may be easier to apply Kilz before painting.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
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I have successfully wallpapered paneling. I put spackling (mud) in the grooves, then papered over. I buy wallpaper on closeout; otherwise it's too expensive.
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We shot drywall mud on paneling with a texture gun. I really didn't think it would work. That was 11 years ago.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

they used

the older

room
decent
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You can paint pretty much anything. Save some time and use a primer (like Kilz or other Zinsser product). It will give you much better coverage, you'll save enough on paint to pay for the primer.
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron) wrote in message

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