Can you hook up a compressor to a portable air tank?

I want to buy the leftover compressor motor from a portable air compressor. The tank is gone. Can I hook this up to one of those portable tanks?
--
--Jim




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<< Can I hook this up to one of those portable tanks? >>
If the pressure switch high setting on the compressor matches the maximum pressure allowed for the tank, answer is yes. If you don't know, it's a gamble. Good luck,
Joe
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compressor.
If you add a checkvalve where the air enters the tank, and an unloader to empty the supply manifold of pressurized air when the unit cuts out, then probably yes.
These items are needed to keep the pump from attempting to restart under high load due to the otherwise high backpressure from the tank.
--

SVL





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Almost forgot, a pop--off type pressure safety release should be included too.
--

SVL



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I built my own air compressor using a 3/4HP Campbell-Housfield tankless compressor and a portable tank. Initially a 4gal tank, now a 10gal.
These tanks had 3/4NPT female fittings, so you can unscrew the existing "head" (which contains a tire filler hose, O/P valve and guage), and install a standard manifold. Re-install the "head" on the manifold (so you get the tire filler hose, O/P valve and guage), and then install standard compressed air M fittings (or whatever) on the other manifold ports. And the compressor of course...
Initially, I did without a pressure switch and unloader.
[The compressor has a O/P valve, and so does the pre-existing tank manifold]
When I switched to 10gal, I installed a pressure switch and unloader.
The first manifold I built from standard copper plumbing pipe. The second manifold was turned out of brass bar stock. I ended up making my own one-way valve (so the unloader would work), because buying one was going to set me back $45.
The unloader is part of the pressure switch.
Then, I built a two wheel cart to mount the whole thing on.
Yeah, I probably could have bought a brand new unit for less than I spent on this. But I _really_ know how they work now, and had something to do in metal shop.
Do realize that the output of a compressor is _hot_. You need to make the compressor->tank plumbing out of metal, and _try_ to get some heat sinking on it. Initially, I just used hose, but it'd heat up to the point where the rubber would soften and it'd blow off the fittings.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Sure! I have been known to use the compressor from an old refrigerator. And use that to feed a conversion tank for an old 30 pounder freon tank. Made both of those back when that was legal.
--

Christopher A. Young
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