Can't pull Honda HRR216VKA lawn mower backwards anymore

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I find on my Craftsman mower, after I release the drive handle, that if I move the mower forward a couple of inches, and then pull backwards that it always allows me to go backwards. If I just release the drive handle and try to pull it backwards, sometimes it will not go backwards. I then push it forward a couple of inches and find that it goes backwards just fine. This is not due to the rear mower protection flap as I have already shortened that so that it does not hang up on the lawn when pulling backwards. Less protection, but a LOT easier to use the mower as I do have a lot of pulling to get around a lot of plants that my wife loves scattered around the yard,
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On 10/11/2011 12:34 AM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Again, that is why I personally will never have a self-propelled mower. My yard also requires a lot of backing up, so the self-propelled isn't much use, but it IS a lot more moving parts to get bollixed up. For me, at least, it violates the KISS principle. The closer I can get to an anvil, the better.
--
aem send...

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While I tend to agree, no anvil at all is even better. I think Honda has turned the power mower into an overly complex system, but no more complex than the absurd lengths homeowners will go to for their precious lawns. I personally prefer my natural wooded landscape with no lawn or lawnmowers
nb
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On 10/11/2011 11:19 AM, notbob wrote:

Preachin' to the choir here. When I hit the lotto and build my dream house, you won't be able to see any neighbor houses. I'll bush-hog a 50 foot firebreak around the house 2-3 times a year, and aside from that, whatever grows, grows. Need to have sunlight on the house, though. Deep woods houses always smell like cabins, since they never dry out.
But back here in realityville- I need to keep my neighbors from burning my place down while I am at work, or whining to the township about me. So, I mow, as seldom as I think I can get away with. No water, no fertilizer, no chemicals. The small animals prefer my lawn- it doesn't smell funny to them.
--
aem sends...

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replying to aemeijers, Size9Wellies wrote:

yard also requires a lot of backing up, so the self-propelled isn't much use, but it IS a lot more moving parts to get bollixed up. For me, at least, it violates the KISS principle. The closer I can get to an anvil, the better.
What a load of sanctimonious pish that does not help in anyway. The answer is to remove the wheel and clean out the ratcheting key mechanism. It is a weak point on what is otherwise a fantastic mower.
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wrote:

re: "Less protection due to shortened flap."
My wifs buys our dogs these hooves to chew on:
http://images.petfooddirect.com/2031411111_lg.jpg
I usually scan the yard before mowing, but I missed one the other day.
My Honda, with full flap still intact, shot one those hooves out from under the mower at such a high speed that I have no idea where it came out.
All I know is I heard a loud BANG! as it hit the house and then landed in driveway about 20 feet from where I was mowing. There was a mark on the house in the 5' area between the glass storm door and the glass on the garage door, right level with the middle of the garage door windows. A few feet in either direction and I'd be replacing at least a pane of glass.
The height was about face level of most of the people that live in my house. I'm sure glad no one standing anywhere near the area.
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Thanks, Bob, for the excellent tip. I'll try it the next time I have the problem.
On 10/11/2011 12:34 AM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote: -

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replying to G Mulcaster, rabbitinred wrote: that flap rests on top of the grass catcher, usually
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wrote:

Don't know about the 216 but I assume the 217 has the same ratchet drive. If that's so then the drive key or keys are wore enough that they do not return to their seat when pulling the mower backwards. If they are bad enough they will come completely out of the seat and will not return. It should be noted that forward drive will still work even in this worn out condition.
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Your problem has nothing to do with the transmission. Each wheel has a ratchet. The reason for the ratchet is to allow free wheel movement when pulling backwards. That is the only reason for a ratchet assembly in the first place.
Within the ratchet assembly the woodruff key catches the perpendicular slope of the ratchet when the mower is being driven. When pulling the mower backwards the inclined slope of the ratchet pushes the woodruff key back into the key seat of the shaft to allow for free wheeling.
Inspect the shaft key seats, springs, internal ratchet teeth, and replace the woodruff drive keys. Use grease on everything.
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On 10/13/2011 7:24 AM, Fred wrote:

As you can see from my October 10, 4:17 pm post, all of a sudden I was able to pull in backwards, for unknown reasons.
The mower is only 13 months old, so it's not likely to need grease or have broken parts in the wheels. The key thing is that with the mower on its side, I couldn't turn either wheel backwards. All I could do is turn the forward (and hear the ratcheting as I did so). Since both wheels were affected equally, the problem had to be in the transmission.
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Your above description is how a properly working mower works.
Both wheels have ratchets so you would expect them to behave equally as you stated above. The transmission shaft ONLY goes forward or stops. It never was designed to go backward in order for you to pull the mower backwards. Going backwards can only be accomplished by you. You must pull the mower backwards and then the two ratchets in the wheels ALLOW you to do this. NOT the transmission shaft.
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replying to Rebel1, roger leahey wrote: Now that I have encountered and dealt with this problem, I know that the issue is solved easily by simple routine maintenance. I am still baffled as to why this issue is not covered in the troubleshooting guide. I have provided detailed simple instructions in a previous post.
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Thanks for the info. Your answer sevens to be the most correct reply to the backing up issue with the Honda mowers.
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replying to Rebel1, Boyd Dunn wrote:

Here is the answer to your problem: When you first got your mower, it worked great and you loved it, the same as I did. After a year or so, it no longer rolled backward-rats! What a bumber! I took off the rear wheels, took everything apart and cleaned it. It was no help. I read every post there was and nobody had a really good answer except for one person and he indicated that the clutch was not disengaging all the way and when that happened, the transmission locked and of course you could not roll backward. I ask myself why the clutch would not disengage all the way, so I begin to look at the cable itself and oiled everything that had anything to do with it. Still no help, it would not roll backward. I decided it had to be something to do with the gearbox itself. The cable attaches to a bracket below and that bracket has a large spring that encircles a stub shaft. Between the leafs of the spring, I noted it was packed with grass residue. I got me a pick and scratched it out, all of it. When I did the rear wheels immediately began to turn-forward and backward.
I hope this helps you also.
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<stuff snipped>

Nice detective work. Should Honda be made aware of the issue? Is it something that can be fixed with a shroud? After reading about how the axle sheared off in the Seattle Duck Boat accident I began to wonder how well industry deals with problems that show up well after production. It seems the answer, in many cases, is "not very well."
--
Bobby G.



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In alt.home.repair, on Tue, 29 Sep 2015 21:31:23 -0400, "Robert Green"

You want to bury the mower?

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of

Arf, arf. Whatever happened to the car with the flat that you filled? Inquiring minds want to know
--
Bobby G.



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Didn't anyone remember this post from 2011, look at the date of the original posting!!!!!!!!!
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On Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 10:32:11 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Ain't it the truth! And let's hope ol' Rebel has replaced that lawn mower since he first wrote about it.
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