Can't Glue Flooring to Concrete Subfloors

I was shopping flooring yesterday and the largest flooring retailer in our area will not glue a wood (of any kind - engineered, veneer, etc.) floor on a house more than 15 years old. The houses around here are built on concrete slabs, so the subfloor on the bottom floor is concrete and the ground in Houston may stay wet for long periods. The floor retailer says the moisture barrier builders place when the house is built has disintegrated by 15 years, so moisture wicks up through the floor and will destroy the glue bond.
Seems like the glue itself would provide a moisture barrier, but what do I know? Anybody have any insight on this?
jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All of the engineered floors I have worked with, "floated" I.E. not attached to ground level concrete slabs. Besides your going to want to put a pad underneath the flooring to give it that cushy feeling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've read floated floors have a hollow sound when you walk on them.
jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
THere are lots of floors for slabs. Some only for above grade. Follow the manufactuer's installation instructions if you want the warranty to apply. The ones I see float and you put a special pad below them.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jim evans wrote:

A. Was this explaination a prelude to any kind of additional charge? Hmm?
B. We put down a hardwood floor on a 40-year-old concrete slab a few years ago (in Houston). Worked swell.
Now think about it: the wooden tiles are inter-locked. So what if the glue goes bad? The floor is maybe going to levitate? Anyway, the floor tiles move - as much as 1/2" - as they expand and contract due to temperature and moisture so it's not as if you want the wood epoxied to the concrete anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It may work in the right area, but if you have more moisture, below grade, etc. hardwood can be a big problem. Engineered wood and the proper barrier is the best way to go.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't think so. They do it on houses younger than 15 years, and all they did was steer me to a snap together floating floor, which didn't seem much different in price. If anything it may have been a little cheaper.
jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.