Can't get good ruling on phone line grounds

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You wish... :)

You may be right. However, I am unaware of any computer networking application that specifies Cat 3 cable.

Some of the garbage cable cranked-out by various manufacturers for the first 5-7 years after 1984 might qualify as Cat 1, although I don't think it is THAT good.
The good, old "light olive gray" "quad" wire (red/green/yellow/black) used for decades would probably qualify as Cat 2 - whatever THAT means.
I have never seen any "Cat" other than 3 and 5e. Whatever happened to 1,2, and 4?
--
:)
JR

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wrote:

CAT 4 was a placeholder so far as I know, it was never in use. CAT 3 I've only seen in 10 Mbit connections, old computer networks but still widely in use. I think CAT 2 was the same as CAT 4, basically just a placeholder. CAT 5 is 100 Mbit connection line, CAT 5e is 1,000 Mbit connection, CAT 6 is 1,000 Mbit, plus providing power capability. Really it's all the same cable, just better tolerances and quality - except CAT 6 which has additional pairs. ****That's how I know it. That's not the pedantic and/or exact definition, there are better descriptions of it out there. So if anyone chimes in looking for an argument I won't even bother - no trolling here please!****
Anyway the whole project is on hold until Seattle gets back to normal, I doubt the phone company has time to worry about my home re-wiring project at this time. Hell, the entire town of Issaquah is out of power, at least it was when I spoke to the local Lowe's guys - and Issaquah is a BIG town, not some podunk.
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wrote:

http://photos.imageevent.com/eigenvector/houseideas/websize/PC160076.JPG
http://photos.imageevent.com/eigenvector/houseideas/websize/PC160077.JPG
Looks like a pretty good ground connection to me, no corrosion and the connection is nice and tight. But that splice! Christ that's a bad job if I ever saw one.
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That was NOT done by a telco employee: They wouldn't have the TIME (or desire to TAKE that much time) to do it like that. A trip back to the truck, if the tech had neglected to bring along the proper connectors to begin with, would be MUCH faster, nevermind BETTER.
--
:)
JR

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wrote:

Yeah I didn't think it was done by a pro. More of the previous owner's bumblings. The verdigris on the copper wires is an especially nice touch!, as is the clipped phone cable left just hanging there rather than simply fixing it.
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Thanks for taking the time to post such detail. I am more informed.

Yeah, so I've heard. Good luck to you folks. I kinda wonder if they'll (Qwest) ask or volunteers to help. Then again, "they" asked for volunteers for Katrina that never panned-out. Despite being one big, fat, happy company, we still seem to stay within the original states that comprised each of the three BOCs (Bell Operating Companies) prior to divestiture: Northwestern Bell, Mountain Bell and Pacific Northwest Bell. We'll see...
--
:)
JR

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Eigenvector wrote:

Connection from phone, through wires, through pipes, etc is grossly more than 10 feet. It is make worse by pipe joints, wire junctions etc. It does not meet 1990 NEC earthing requirements. I suspect your connection to earth is well over 50 feet AND does not make that earthing connection directly. It would be a prescription for electronics damage.
There are a number of ways to fix this. But you may regard them as too much work. The amount of work not justified by the risk. This for the benefit of others who are at more risk to damage.
For example that phone line could be rerouted to enter at adjacent to AC electric. Or wire is routed inside building well separated from any other wire or pipe to first connect to a protector at earth electrode - and only then distributing phone service to the house. Another suggestion from a utility is demonstrated by bad, ugly, and good figures in: http://www.cinergy.com/surge/ttip08.htm
There is no way around a short ground connection (lower impedance) and a common earthing electrode if electronics protection is desired.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Just remember grounding = safety issue. That's there for a reason. You notice surge protector on your Dmark. block? Where would surge current go? Say when lightning strikes.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Telephone line protection here, here which AFIK follows Bell Canada (ATT) practice is a 'Protector' mounted where the telephone line enters the premises. Sometimes mounted outside but often inside the house. That protector requires a ground.
The telephone company would either have driven their own ground rod or, as in our case run a grounding wire to the incoming metal electrical conduit which is grounded by the power company; that ground is also bonded to metallic water pipe.
The protector (similar ones have been in use since the 1800s) provides voltage breakdown protection from each side of the telephone pair. Those are either repairable manually or by replacing small slide in units; they are essentially small spark gaps that will break down to ground if voltage exceeds a certain figure. Can't remember what that voltage is offhand.
Also these days if one is within distance of the server, Internet service can also be provided via the telephone pair.
The cable TV company have a coax entering the premises and it also has a grounded protector.
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wrote:

with a #6 copper wire.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Correct: I omitted that. It should be and ours (both telephone and cable TV company) are bonded.
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