Can Standard Mortar Mix be made Pourable?

I have not used mortar mix much except on my chimney, but I would like something self-leveling that I can pour between flagstones where the old mortar has displaced or loosened. I have seen some epoxy products that claim to be able to do this, but they don't seem to be readily available. Could someone suggest a specific product for my need that can be found at the Depot or similar place? Thanks. Frank
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Sika makaes a self-leveling sealant that is available at my local HD (SoCal)
but it may not give the look you want http://www.sikaconstruction.com/con/con-dealer/con-dealer-sealing.htm
other possible products would be
non-shrink, non-metallic pourable grout
http://www.chargar.com/Products/prod_jc.html
cheers Bob
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Thanks Bob! These are excellent leads! I do need something that will approximate the grey color of the original mortar. Frank

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The Seka looks like the better bet, but I think it may be too elastic. These spaces that I need to fill are occasionally as much as an inch wide and an inch deep. I came across an interesting possibility. I have always been impressed with the versatility of Bondo, and the strength of the type with fiberlass fibers. It appears that if you add regular fiberglass resin to it, it can be made pourable. The color would be about right. Now if it just wouldn't crumble! I might try it. Frank

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frank1492 wrote:

I think it would be likely to be too brittle and terribly expensive unless you have only a very small area...
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frank1492 writes:

Cementitious products are thixotropic. Just add more water and agitate. You'll get a weaker final strength, but for this application that doesn't matter.
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Yep, this is just the "filler" between the flagstones in a patio. I wonder if anything would be gained by using a thinned out mixture of Top 'n Bond, which has a latex component. Maybe that would tend to be stronger in a thinner mix? Frank
On Tue, 20 Sep 2005 20:21:33 -0500, Richard J Kinch

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frank1492 writes:

The polymer emulsion ("latex") component is there to increase bonding strength, not compressive strength. No benefit to your application.
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After a little additional research, I believe anchoring cement is the best way to go, especially since I have a very small area to do. Thanks to all for your ideas!!! Frank
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