Can I use Shingles??

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I'm ready to shingle a new patio roof (16x10) the slope is just over 1:12. I live in central Texas, not much snow. I know shingle manfacturers (GAF) do not recommend shingles less then 2:12, but if I double the felt/tar paper up should shingleing still be OK? Thanks..
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(AgaPSDIVER) wrote:

Doesn't that answer your question?

-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in message (AgaPSDIVER) wrote:

Actually, an inspector, before I bought house, said that 3-tab shingles on a flat section of roof were okay. Honest, he did. Of course, the retained moisture caused the roof and adjacent framing to rot pretty rapidly, which I noticed on demolishing all that crap shortly after moving in. Now, it's pitched at 1 in 6, dry as proverbial bone.
Do it right, or don't do it, IMHO. Next question. :')
John
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(AgaPSDIVER) wrote:

Now, who will give me even odds that this "inspector" is a "home inspector," and what odds am I offered that he was employed by the seller or a real estate broker? I'll want a bit better than even on the latter, as there are so damned many of these "inspectors" now. Just about one for every licensed real estate agent . . . or soon will be, I'll wager.
(I am not a betting man, incidentally; so take heed!)

"Honest, he did." Meaning he actually said it. No surprise there.
"Honest, he was," as in the Cat in the Hat? Nah.
Jim

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John Barry wrote:

(AgaPSDIVER) wrote:

That wasn't an inspector. That was an idiot impersonating an inspector.
Matt
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<< shingle manfacturers (GAF) do not recommend shingles less then 2:12, >>
Why do you want to suspend the laws of physics? You know you will have to do it over in a few years, so do it right, do it once and get on with other more important projects. There are numerous choices of more suitable roofing materials in the market, perhaps Ondura, metal standing seam, just for openers. Choosing one of these could add more value to your home than common shingles. Survey the NG archives and you are likely to get some more nice alternatives. Good luck.
Joe
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If your feel you really have to do this you can get a bucket of asphalt cement and lay a 1 inch bead along the nailing strip on EVERY SINGLE COURSE. If you're careful, and don't get cement all over the freakin' place, that should seal it down nicely. Or you could shorten the courses, leaving a smaller exposure but that calls for more shingles than the standard application, hence more cost. But you really should reconsider and use roll 90lb mineral surfaced roofing. Use a lot of cement and don't face nail except at the gable sides if called for. And cover any exposed nail head with cement. It's not as esthetically pleasing but it does the job.
says...

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I assume that the concern is water getting up under shingles that have not laid flat and bonded to the shingle below. This would only occur from the wind blowing the rain up under the shingles... surely not from water running uphill. If the front edges of the shingles lay flat and bond properly... what are the concerns with 1:12 pitch. Thanks..
On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 11:12:36 -0500, Stoic

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(AgaPSDIVER) wrote:

And why are you not worried about wind blowing rain up under the shingles?

It's not just water you need to worry about. The shallower the pitch of the roof, the more easily wind can rip the shingles right off.
The manufacturer recommends a minimum pitch for a REASON. They didn't just make something up.
Everybody who has responded so far has told you the same thing the manufacturer says: don't do it. The roof pitch is too shallow. Of course, you question the manufacturer's recommendation, so there isn't any reason to suppose you'll pay any more attention to the advice you receive here -- which of course leads one to wonder why you bothered posting in the first place, since you appear determined to do what you want regardless.
Prediction: in six months, you'll be posting again, asking how to fix a leaky 1:12 roof.

-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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The key is to be bonded properly. How are you going to know that they are bonded properly and that the bond is holding when the shingles start to get past prime and curl? 2:12 is bad enough 1:12 is asking for trouble.
Just my opinion.
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Eh, I'm still foggy on the original question. Is the person who posted the original question trying to get away with using shingles that are less than what the manufacturer recommends by using some other roof-sealing method and cuttin corners -- oppos, cost -- because he has a ton of some roof sealer crap sitting around in his garage, or something else?
Call me absolutely naieve, but the way I see it, major corporations who manufacturer shingles don't stay in business for a few generations by giving out bad advice about the best use of their own products. But that's just me. Think whatever suits your own self.
AJS

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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 17:01:43 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (AgaPSDIVER) scribbled this interesting note:

(Shaking head from side to side..."Tsk, tsk, tsk...)
I'm going out on a limb here. You've already bought your shingles and actually read the package and found out they are not recommended for your application?
First things first. The strip of adhesive on the shingles is not, I repeat is not to seal against water penetration, it is specifically to guard against the wind blowing the shingles off.
Secondly, water does indeed sometimes go uphill. Not far, but have you ever watched water when you slowly pour it out of a cup? The surface tension of the fluid carries it around the lowest point of the cup and some of it ends up higher than the lowest point on the other side!
It is very simple, if you install shingles on this roof you will have leaks. Maybe not immediately, but you will have them. This is not conjecture or guess work, it is a certainly. Even if you seal every joint and fastener you will have leaks. (We once had the sheriff of a neighboring county insist, against all our best advice, on having shingles installed just as you propose. We sealed every joint between the butt ends of every shingle as well as every fastener. And we were using laminated, "architectural" style shingles. Not too much after that we got a call from him telling us that he would pay us to come back out, remove what he insisted upon having put in, and replace it with a single membrane type roof. End of story.)
Use them if you like. Some people have to learn by experiencing things first hand and either cannot or will not learn from the experience of others...
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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AgaPSDIVER wrote:

I think the main concerns are:
1. Water being blown up under the shingles as you say, 2. Wind lifting the shingles up, 3. Voiding of the manufacturers warranty on the shingles should you ever need it.
Matt
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(remove NS to use the address) 614.937.0463 voice 208.975.1011 fax
http://worthingtonengineering.com
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Depends on your definition of "OK," but I'd say no.
If you don't want to go with a low-pitch, surfaced, heat-applied roll roofing (and for so small a project, you might very well not), I would suggest a regular, surfaced, 90# or heavier roll roofing. Go with the manufacturer's installation instructions for your very shallow pitch (if the mfg even recommends the product for that pitch) or start at the bottom, overlap each successive course by apx. 6" in a bed of roofing cement and nail. Seal the nail heads with roofing cement or other approved method. I'd recommend metal flashing at house abutment due to the sharp angle subtended by the 1:12 pitch. Bed it in roofing cement as well.
Of course, the best method in the long haul is heat applied product.
Jim
PS You will not like the appearance of shingles at so shallow a pitch or a relatively low roof. If appearance is a criteria, be sure to stay away from shingles. The mismatch with your existing house, whether exactly the same shingle or not, will be MOST apparent.
PSS Gotta get in my plug for the language. Once you have roofed your patio, you no longer have a patio . . . by definition. A "roofed patio" is a pretty good description of a patio that has been retro-roofed, but otherwise is an oxymoron.
JL
----- Original Message ----- From: AgaPSDIVER Newsgroups: alt.building.construction,alt.home.repair Sent: Tuesday, 16 December, 2003 10:09 Subject: Can I use Shingles??
I'm ready to shingle a new patio roof (16x10) the slope is just over 1:12. I live in central Texas, not much snow. I know shingle manfacturers (GAF) do not recommend shingles less then 2:12, but if I double the felt/tar paper up should shingleing still be OK? Thanks..

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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 13:07:38 -0500, "Js Walker Lazenby Jr"

90# will rot in five to ten years.

Heat applied is not the only way to go. http://www.tamko.com/com/mcs.htm Just one of the ways to go.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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I think your main problem if you shingle it would be high winds. Think you get quite a bit of that where you live. I would look for another solution.
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:09:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (AgaPSDIVER) wrote:

It will work, but don't expect it to last.
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:09:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (AgaPSDIVER) wrote:

Why not put ribbed steel on it. The same stuff used on pole barns. Comes in many colors and looks nice. It will outlast shingles many times over and is easier to install. The price may be a little higher, but it's worth the extra cost. Be sure to install as recommended, using neo-washer nails or screws.
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