Can I use pressure treated wood inside?

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Doug Kanter wrote:

Oh, I get it now. You're just smarter than the rest of us! Let me guess: a Libertarian, huh?

Guesstimates: Couple hundred million square feet of Wolmanized decking out there, built over the last 30-40 years, people walk on it in bare feet and lean on those nasty railings, and I've yet to hear of the grand health epidemic that you theorize. Millions of pool users are not having their feet fall off, nor have the Uncle Joe's and Granpap's of the world developed elbow cancer from spending long hours at the picnic table,

Or maybe those kids don't have a father with his head stuck so far up his ass that they don't get to take a breath? Let me guess, you tell them to push doors open with their elbows and won't let them roast a marshmallow until you've washed the stick?
Paranoid idiot.
--
TP / Network Man __________________________________
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In a previous article snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) writes:
;Contrast that with creosote. Creosote certainly _does_ leach. Quite a bit. :So much so, for example, that despite being treated fairly uniformly with ;creosote, over time the top end of a telephone pole effectively has _no_ :creosote, but the butt end (and earth surrounding it) has a lot more than ;it started with. This is of considerable importance to electrical companies. :They can cut the butt ends off, and pitch the rest of the pole in the normal ;waste stream. Only have to pay hazmat disposal on the butt ends.
!!! Now I finally understood what they did with the poles around here after they took the power underground 2 months ago. They came by and lop the top off everyone of them - each post cut off at a seemingly different point. Then later they come back to take the butt ends out. Learn something new everyday. :-)
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replying to Doug Kanter, ganeden wrote: The wood that was treated in the 50's yes, the dark brown often black colored wood. The same wood treated and used as telephone poles throughout the 50's, 60's, 70's and into the 80's. YES, that wood is caustic.
However the new CCA treatment is less caustic, less irritable in consideration to allergies. IT DOES HAVE the CCA process and residue within the fiber of the grain so it SHOULD NOT BE USED as an INTERIOR product. 1 side of the product needs to be to the elements of air, otherwise it WILL MOLD. The CCA treated wood CAN NOT BE USED AS A HEATING SOURCE for it is arsenic based and WILL CAUSE SIDE EFFECTS. look into Boy Scouts of America VS USN
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Doug Kanter wrote:

You most certainly can use pressure treated lumber for anything - including playground equipment and food preparation areas. It's been done for decades. Only in the past few years have the hysterics found something more to be outraged about - "It's for the children!"
As you say yourself, "... (it is) gradually being dismantled and replaced..." which indicates something considerably less than an imminent threat.
Besides, pressure-treated wood no longer contains arsenic (damned enviromental whackos).
Anybody who would wear gloves, long-sleeve shirts, and a breathing mask when handling pressure treated wood is a pussy.
As to the original question, no don't use pressure treated wood indoors. It comes wet. As it drys, it warps. If, for example, you intend to build a fence using this stuff, spread the pickets out in the garage for a month to let them dry, else you'll end up with a curly fence that has 3/8" gaps.
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He's talking about recycled PT lumber that's several years old. It's as dry as it's going to get.
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on 23 Apr 2004:

I guess this means it is also harmful to pets? I have an enclosure I built under my deck with a deer-proof mesh material (deck is 8' off the ground) so they can go outdoors safely. So the arsenic seeps into the ground, is that how it works?
--
Cheryl

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on 23 Apr 2004:

The experts here say it's safe because it hasn't been proven harmful. Unscientific, but I seem to be outvoted. :-)
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On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 03:17:14 GMT, "rck"

Locally, sill plates, on interior or exterior walls, are required to be treated. :)
Jeff
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rck wrote:

Perhaps these will help you decide: http://www.in.gov/idem/planning/cca/ccafactsheet.html http://dep.state.ct.us/wst/recycle/lumber.htm http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/factsheets/chemicals/1file.htm http://www.greenbuilder.com/sourcebook/WoodTreatment.html#PRECAUTIONS
CCA-treated wood is supposed to have been phased out of the retail stream by the end of 2003. Keeping it and its toxic components out of the waste stream is a priority, so recycling in other projects is recommended. Interior use isn't specifically prohibited -- keeping it away from skin and human or animal water supplies is considered essential, and it should never be burned. If sawing, use goggles and a face mask.
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I did a fair amount of research before building my deck using CCA pressure treated lumber and decided that it was wise to take precautions in handling the wood, particularly where dust might be developed. I saw nothing though that indicated that fumes could be a problem. Seems unlikely given the low vapor pressures of the chemicals involved. And if there are concerns about leaching, you can apply some of the common deck finishes to practically eliminate that risk, as indicated by the following report of tests by the Forest Products Laboratory:
Coatings Found to Greatly Reduce Leaching from CCA-Treated Wood-- Concerns have increased that arsenic pentoxide, chromium trioxide, or copper oxide released from the surface of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood used in playground equipment and decks can harm people or the environment. Although experts disagree on the severity of the threat posed to children or other users of treated wood products, many consumers are seeking methods to minimize any risk of chemical exposure. Coatings or sealers are often recommended, but their efficacy in preventing leaching has undergone little evaluation. To address this question, researchers at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) recently evaluated the ability of three common coatings to reduce leaching from CCA-treated wood. Replicate matched specimens of treated 2 by 6 lumber were given one of the following coatings:(1) latex primer followed by one coat of outdoor latex paint, (2) oil-based primer followed by one coat of oil-based paint, or (3) two coats of a penetrating oil semi-transparent deck stain. The specimens were then exposed to 30 inches of artificial rainfall for 3 weeks. The water running off of the specimens was collected and analyzed for preservative components. The results were very promising. All three coatings reduced leaching of arsenic pentoxide, chromium trioxide, and copper oxide by over 99% in comparison to uncoated specimens. None of the water collected from specimens coated with latex or oil-based paint contained any detectable copper, chromium, or arsenic. In some cases, water collected from the specimens that were coated with the penetrating oil stain did contain detectable levels, but the highest level of arsenic detected in these samples was still well below the EPA's drinking water standard. This study suggests that the application of these common coatings is an excellent recommendation for consumers who are worried about chemical exposure from CCA-treated wood. [Source: Stan Lebow, Wood Preservation and Fire Research Work Unit, FPL)
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On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 03:17:14 GMT, "rck"

I would use PT wood where it touches the floor in the basement, or the likely place where it might get moisture and avoid it elsewhere. Cutting PT makes dust that you should not inhale and PT slivers in the skin are slow to heal. Keep looking for good premium grade 2x4's--you'll eventually find them. The arsenic compound stays in the wood. Yes, avoid it on the interior wall.
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