Can I use pressure treated wood inside?

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Problem: All the wood sold in lumberyards and other stores around here would have been tossed out as culls in past years but now it is sold as premium grade lumber. It is twisted, green, full of knots, shaved along the edges. I can't buy any good 2x4's anymore. A friend is tearing apart a deck and offered me some of the best 2x4's I've even seen but they are pressure treated. Does the arsenic stay in the wood or does it emit fumes over time? Should I avoid using it for an interior wall?
Bob
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1) You should not use it indoors. Not anyplace indoors. No place. Zip. Nada.
2) You should not use it outdoors anyplace humans might come into contact with it. That means decks, porches, rails, fences. Use it under the deck for the main supports, but wear gloves & long sleeves when you handle it. This is why playground equipment made from treated lumber is gradually being dismantled and replaced. There are people who don't think this is necessary, but those people don't have children.
3) I have no trouble finding decent wood at Lowes, Home Depot, and 3 locally owned lumber yards. Try harder.

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Interesting, When I replaced a rotted section of sill plate (I belive that is what the call the first layrer of lumber on top of the foundation) in my basement, the building inspector himself told me to use pressure treated lumber... And this was just 2 years ago...

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I guess he doesn't read anything but the sports page.
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Does that still apply with today's pressure treated wood where they no longer use arsenic in the treatment of the wood?

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So basement framing would require treated lumber for the bottom plates of wall framing if that framing is in contact with concrete. You can also use cedar or redwood for this, at least in our area. I just framed my basement and had to use pt lumber for contact with the concrete floor. This lumber is now less toxic than it was even a few years ago.
Dave
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replying to DR, Bob, ganeden wrote: Arsenate IS Arsenic
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On Monday, November 7, 2016 at 9:14:05 AM UTC-5, ganeden wrote:

Unfortunately, Bob has died from Arsenic poisoning because you waited 12 years to point out that "Arsenate IS Arsenic".
So sad. Bob was nice guy.
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On Mon, 7 Nov 2016 06:42:18 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Yeah, too bad he licked that PT wood before CCA was pretty much banned in the US (only used in marine construction and utility poles these days) BTW there are plenty of places where PT is required for interior use. (bottom plates on slabs, window bucks etc) It is usually sequestered inside the wall tho.
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I'd bet you aren't shopping in middle Tennessee. We have Home Depot, Lowe's, the lumberyards, The Building Center, all the big chains and the little stores. The wood in the stores around here is garbage. I don't know what you mean by "try harder". Does that mean I should drive to the Northwest? I'm glad you have good wood, but that doesn't help me.
Bob
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I've had no problem finding really good wood at the local home depot, lowes, or lumberyards here in east tennessee.
On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 04:24:30 GMT, "rck"

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Doug Kanter wrote:

Sez you.

What a flaming crock of shit.

Uhhh, no. If it's being dismantled and replaced it's likely because it was never properly maintained and is discolored and splintering.

Ohhh, spare me. Go lock your kids in a bubble and keep them there until all of the toxicity, disease and dirt is removed from the world. Kiss them goodbye before you do, 'cause they're never coming out.
Twit.
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TP / Network Man __________________________________
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Arsenic is bad for everyone except YOUR family? How do you figure?

Uhhh...no. It's being dismantled because it's often found to still be oozing the stuff it's treated with, which tests WAY positive for arsenic. Only stupid people would let their kids climb on such stuff.

Germs are one thing. But, you don't build up resistance to arsenic. Go back to the television.
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Uhhhh... no. None of the studies that I've seen to date has managed to prove the notion that it leaches to any significant extent, as opposed to the builder's being sloppy and leaving construction residue (eg: sawdust) lying around. Or idiots burning the stuff.
Contrast that with creosote. Creosote certainly _does_ leach. Quite a bit. So much so, for example, that despite being treated fairly uniformly with creosote, over time the top end of a telephone pole effectively has _no_ creosote, but the butt end (and earth surrounding it) has a lot more than it started with. This is of considerable importance to electrical companies. They can cut the butt ends off, and pitch the rest of the pole in the normal waste stream. Only have to pay hazmat disposal on the butt ends.
There's one study done several years ago where they had people rub PT lumber and lick their hands. Tests showed no detectable levels of arsenic, _despite_ the test being sensitive enough to detect the amount of arsenic detectable after eating a single sardine. [arsenic naturally occurs in sardines.]
Are they recalling sardines? ;-)
Most (if not all) of the stories about medical effects from CCA-treated lumber is a result of gross misuse. Ie: living beside someone who has been burning it in their fireplace for _years_, or carpenters who haven't been wearing dust masks for _years_.
Yes, you can hurt yourself or others if you don't handle the stuff properly.
But there's no real evidence that if it is handled properly that it's a hazard.
The government has decided to remove the stuff from the general market primarily because of the risk of misuse. Not because of the risk from proper use.
I personally wouldn't use treated lumber (CCA or ACQ) inside a house _unless_ it was necessary for rot resistance. And I'd paint it.
But I don't hesitate to use it outdoors where appropriate.
I can get decent non-treated lumber from lots of places - heck, half the time the treated lumber is of worse quality than the untreated.
It's also worthy of note that not all CCA has been restricted. CCA is still permitted for some purposes. Simply because ACQ isn't nearly as good as CCA for extreme conditions.

Factually false.

Actually you can build up a tolerance to arsenic if the dosages are low and long term. But it's very stupid to rely on that.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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wrote in message

Call the health department for Monroe County NY and wander around a few phone extensions until you find the person who conducted the rigorous study here. Have a good day.
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-snip-

Curious that the Monroe County NY website uses a CT study as a source when they talk about leaching-- http://www.monroecounty.gov/org529.asp?orgIDR9&storytypeid=&storyID =&
When was this "rigorous study" done?
Jim
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wrote in message

Based on memory of the two talk shows which discussed it, I'd guess 3 years. I've seen at least two playgrounds rebuilt with synthetic stuff, playgrounds whose structures were nowhere near the end of their life cycles.
Bottom line, though, is simple: There is a certain segment of the population that believes anything which is sold is automatically safe. And, this same segment has difficulty extrapolating. So, if a mfr says "use gloves when handling this wood, and wear a face mask when cutting it", it doesn't dawn on some people that maybe it's not such a great idea to build a deck whose fences people will lean on in bare skin, or a picnic table. Or, perhaps these people's kids are different from every other kid that's ever walked this earth. Their kids don't put their hands in or near their mouths constantly. Yeah...that's it.
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They _also_ tell you to wear eye protection and a dust masks when using power saws on non-PT wood.
So that rules out non-PT wood too.
And plastic.
Ohmygawd!
My toilets are dangerous and shouldn't be touched!     (draino instructions say to wear gloves...)
Paint is dangerous and shouldn't be touched!     (the instructions say "do not eat")
Steel is dangerous and shouldn't be touched!     (welders wear eye protection and gloves)
Glass is dangerous!     (you could get cut...)
You get the idea.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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All the things you mention are visible, and easily avoidable. Arsenic is NOT avoidable, especially for little kids. But, you're right. I get the idea. Not the same idea, though.
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I have a hair dryer with a caution to not use it under water... :)
Jeff
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