Can I use exterior flood lights in recessed interior lighting?

Just got back from Home Despot. I wanted PAR38 90 watt halogen bulbs for the recessed lighting in my basement (following advice received right here in this very forum), and I got them alright, but I see now that these are marked "exterior." What is the difference between an interior and an exterior lamp? If I put them in my basement cans, will my house explode?
Also saw for sale full spectrum floodlights. I am moving to halogen because my incandescents are too yellow, so I was intrigued. But I see that they are only available up to about 65 watt. Is there a reason for this?
Thanks!
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Yes the "exterior" bulbs are fine. The exterior ones have to be a little tougher to take the rain on hot glass.
Without a long lesson on color, perception and the scientific method... Avoid anything that says its "full spectrum" as it is a snake-oil sales term without a real meaning. There are many real and important issues regarding lighting color but very few folks actually understand much of it. Once you know what you really want then you can find the products that match.
RickR
Inquiringmind wrote:

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I like my full-spectrum flourescents. I'll grant that they don't look all that much like daylight, though, so just think of it as another name, like "cool white", and "warm white".
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I'm sure you like them because they fit what you know you want, "like daylight" is only one measurement. You probably paid a premium and they are likely less efficient.
Cool & Warm white are color names that vary little from one maker to another. Also virtually all makers have most of their lamps available in these colors. BTW most fluorescent colors are now referenced by two numbers, a "temperature" like 3500K or 5000K and a quality like RE70 or RE80. Often they are abbreviated so look carefully.
"Full Spectrum" means only what that particular marketer wants it to mean, at that time. If you want a "daylight" color look for a high "temperature" 4100, 5000 & 6500K are commonly used (the high the bluer.) The CRI number is a quality of color, the higher the less distortion of colors. 70 is commercial/industrial, 80 is residential, and 90 is specialty quality. FYI- warm white is 55, very poor.
As for Heybub's idea of colored glasses, GE makes blue tinted bulbs for just that reason. They are called "Reveal". GE sales pitch is: "Reveal's unique neodymium glass filters out dull, yellow rays, unlike regular soft white bulbs, leaving you with enhanced, vivid surroundings."
Are you confused yet??
RickR
Goedjn wrote:

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my perception, at the price of a little more glare. They are more expensive, but not as much so as an aquarium/grow light. (If you've got a 3-rod fixture, you can get a nice pink-yellow-blue rainbow by putting one of each in.)

That's more or less what I said, below.

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Thanks much!
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Inquiringmind wrote:

No.
If your incadescent bulbs are too yellow, try blue-tinted glasses. Works wonders.
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