Can I use a router on oak?

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Hi, You didn't ask, but rounding over the end grain on the sides of stair treads is not the "normal" way to get bullnose sides. At least around here, a side trim piece is added, mitered at the front. That way you don't have any end grain showing. Lewis
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good point.

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My .02 cents worth...
Use a good and sharp bit with a bearing roller to reduce drag. Keep the router moving. Also take small bites and make a few passes over the edge to achieve the final radius.
Luck, Brian

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In addition, I would try chamfering the edges on the ts prior to running the router.

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Take note of who ever told you that and don't listen to them. In fact I just finished making a new tread for my MIL's front door. I used a piece of oak stair tread, ripped it down, glued it up and then routed all the edges.
Like any wood, use a sharp bit, and take small passes.
Bernie

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