Can I use a router on oak?

Page 1 of 2  
I want to buy the premade oak stair treads (steps) and use a half inch router to smooth the edges, will this work? The front part of the tread is already rounded but my customer wants the sides rounded too. People told me the router will burn the wood because oak is hard, is there a trick to rounding without burning?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
maybe you could experiment on some scrap pieces??
(To send e-mail, remove NOSPAM from address)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Check your local laws and see what they say. I know here in West Virginny it's against the law!
They have some DUMB laws, though. I can't even use a router on my sister legally.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have an oak desk and the router sits on top of it. So far, it has not burned it at all. Where the router connects to the computer there is plenty of space for ventilation. If you mount the router on the stairs, be sure the is out of the way so no one trips on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I was making some dog dish stands with oak tops. I had no problems. Use standard practices and keep the router moving
Frank
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used a router on an oak once - I wasn't able to cut it down at all, one heck of a big oak. I coverid it in gasoline just to soften the wood up and then started the router back up and damn if it didn't burn it. I stay away from oaks with my router now. I only use it on small poplars and an occasional sycamore.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23 Sep 2004 00:45:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (ississauga) wrote (with possible editing):

Yes. Take off a little at a time and keep the router moving. If the cutter is dull, sharpen it first - nothing burns hardwood like a dull cutter.
--
Larry
Email to rapp at lmr dot com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| I want to buy the premade oak stair treads (steps) and use a half inch | router to smooth the edges, will this work? The front part of the | tread is already rounded but my customer wants the sides rounded too. | People told me the router will burn the wood because oak is hard, is | there a trick to rounding without burning?
Use a carbide tipped router bit or you probably will burn your stock.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Carbide is needed to prevent burning? Would you care to elaborate on that? Of course you realize that, although it will hold an edge longer, carbide is more difficult to sharpen, and HSS bits will often take a better edge. That at one point, having trouble with some burning on a particular piece of cherry, I switched from carbide to a freshly sharpened HSS bit and eliminated the burning. And you know that the combination of speed, feed rate and depth of cut will have the greatest influence on burning. So, given that, what's your point on carbide? GerryG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| >| I want to buy the premade oak stair treads (steps) and use a half inch | >| router to smooth the edges, will this work? The front part of the | >| tread is already rounded but my customer wants the sides rounded too. | >| People told me the router will burn the wood because oak is hard, is | >| there a trick to rounding without burning? | > | >Use a carbide tipped router bit or you probably will burn your stock.
As you said "although it (carbide) will hold an edge longer". Experience has shown me that HSS may be as sharp as carbide, but one doesn't rout hardwood long before the bit is dull and you're burning your stock. To me, with all other things be equal, the longevity of a carbide edge makes it my choice for router bits. Carbide tipped saw blades have almost completely replaced un-tipped saw blades as the blades of choice in almost all saws today for the same reason.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

variable is the amount of routing you intend to do. In general, I've heard it said that carbide lasts about 5x HSS. On the other hand, I can route hardwood for several projects with HSS before it begins to get dull, which is a bit different than what you've seen. I've got a few HSS bits that I use to hog out MDF and particleboard, which also more quickly dulls carbide, but these same bits have been used for maybe twenty years now. There are also cheaper carbide bits that will tend to chip out much sooner, and they also have a place for some projects where they're maybe 1/4 the cost but get the job done. For saw blades, if you mean circular saws, I won't argue that one since sharpening a HSS saw blade takes quite awhile. Overall, most of my router bits are of a quality carbide, but the others have a use as well. GerryG
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GerryG wrote:

I suggest that the original poster subscribe to the rec.woodworking newsgroup and post the question there. Those guys have oodles of experience with routers on almost any type of wood. For a newbie, they will try to help out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Of course, there are some who clean the carbide and touch up the faces with 600 diamond file prior to routing, and sometimes during long runs. Process is exactly the same as your HSS.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Exactly the same? I'm not talking about a 600 grit touch up here. You may also get chip-outs in carbide, which can't be fixed. I've taken old and badly burned HSS bit and fixed them good as new. And yes, I have touched up carbide, and most of my bits are carbide. I've even ground specific profiles on HSS. GerryG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
But, of course, I was. Which Is why I said it. It works, which is why I do it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23 Sep 2004 00:45:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (ississauga) wrote:

Should do.
Oak routs fine. Some is a bit hard and splintery, so watch out for splitting on end grain and use a spelch plate (bit of scrap clamped to the end of the cut).
If it's burning, turn the speed down and the feed rate up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(ississauga) wrote:

No "trick" really, just good routing practices: 1) Keep your cut depth shallow. Don't try to take off too much wood in one pass. Remember that, with a roundover bit like you'll be using, as you lower the bit, each pass takes off a lot more wood than the previous pass. So for your first pass, you might be able to lower the bit as much as 1/8" -- but for the second and third passes, no more than 1/16", and for subsequent passes, you should probably limit it to 1/32". 2) Keep the router moving fairly quickly. If you move it too slowly, the wood will burn.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 23 Sep 2004 13:18:17 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

look here:
http://www.patwarner.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23 Sep 2004 00:45:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (ississauga) wrote:

I made oak window trim and base boards for my kitchen with a router and had no problems at all.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Professional Shop Rat: 14,451 days in a GM plant. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well the "front part" of the tread is already round, and you want to do the sides, which are end-grain. End grain tends to burn easier anyway. Like other people said, take little bites, don't stop in one place, and keep a constant feed rate. The other thing you might want to think about is if someone you know has a shaper. Sometimes shaper cutters move at a slower rpm and have more cutting surfaces. That might keep things cooler.
(ississauga)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.