Can I run drill off of car battery

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I got one of those Skil 12 volt battery drills. The battery charger died. Skil told me the battery probably shorted. Well, by the time I finish getting a new charger and battery, I may as well get a new drill. I am not fond of Skil anyhow. However, rather than toss the old drill, I am wondering if anyone has ever run one of these off a car battery? I can easily rig a lighter plug and hook some wires to the drill. It needs 12 volts and thats what the car battery is. At least this way I can still use it around the car, and I also have a 12v gel cell so I can use it portable.
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The voltage is right but the amperage may be way too high and fry the drill-- but then if it did, no real loss.
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Patrick Cleburne wrote:

but the amperage may be way too high and fry the
Huh?? How so?

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the person who wrote this needs to enroll in a basic electricity class
too much amperage capacity in the voltage source will not fry anything, a device will only pull what it needs based on the resistance of the drill or whatever
he could hook up his drill to an industrial battery that is the size of a house, that is rated at 12V and 1 million amps, and it would not hurt the drill
a shorted drill is a different matter, it should be thrown away, a fuse can protect a short device from melting etc., but shorts are exceeding rare in cordless drill anyway
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or
That was my first thought, but with motors, the motor will generate a back EMF and if it is not turning fast enough, it will burn out. The rechargables will not usually be able to put out enough current long enough for this to hapen. Hooked to a car battery with a capacity of a few hundred amps and the drill could burn out very quick in a stalled situation.
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a
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Coreect. I have an old one that I do it with all the time. Just be careful not to stall. If it starts to slow down back off. I have approached stall many times without any trouble.
I don't know if the cigarette plug is adequate. I clamp it to the battery terminals.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

It should have a fuse that would preclude drawing hundreds of amps.
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: >I got one of those Skil 12 volt battery drills. The battery charger : > died. Skil told me the battery probably shorted. Well, by the time I : > finish getting a new charger and battery, I may as well get a new : > drill. I am not fond of Skil anyhow. However, rather than toss the : > old drill, I am wondering if anyone has ever run one of these off a : > car battery? I can easily rig a lighter plug and hook some wires to : > the drill. It needs 12 volts and thats what the car battery is. At : > least this way I can still use it around the car, and I also have a : > 12v gel cell so I can use it portable. : : The voltage is right but the amperage may be way too high and fry the : drill-- but then if it did, no real loss. : :
Uhhhh, NO! What school did you go to? The current depends on the VOLTAGE, especially in the DC world. A car battery, with the exception of a fault like putting an accidental short on it across the drill wires somehow, would 99.999% sure work fine both with and without the engine running. A 1 ton 12V battery would work, too. You'd want to be certain there could be no way to put a short across the car battery, but that's easy to do.
Please quit guessing and rationalizing; it doesn't become you.
Pop
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That is correct, but some devices are designed to operate correctly and safely by the power source's internal resitance. Since Ni-Cd batteries have a low resistance, the car battery may be safe. The drill may not deliver max torque due to the loss in the wires. Use a heavier cable if distance is great. John
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You dont need real heavy wire 14 ga works fine, you wont get voltage drop that will matter or hurt anything. On high amp draw RC cars I have a 30 amp fuse is used but not because of motor damage but speed control damage, which the drill has in the trigger VS. Here stalling with high amp could fry a cheap or old drill since high amp was not in its design. Safe would likely be 10a for a 12v drill. My new makita has a curcuit that shuts down the drill and resets on stall surge. My old Makita doesnt, Use a fuse and dont stall it, But drilling metal is hard not to stall the drill. Maybe wire in an inline auto type fuse, experiment, start with 5a, New RC controlers can handle 100a, but cheap drill are cheap and built to the packs limitations. A 7 cell 1200ma can blow a 30a fuse stalled. A good motor will just get real hot, but a cheap drill who knows, Fusing is the only way to protect it, Any RC shop will know the proper amp fuse.
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On Sun, 8 Jan 2006 07:51:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

RC ??

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(m Ransley)

Radio Controlled=RC
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(m Ransley)

Radio Controlled. I used to fly RC planes and race cars as well, We used a hand held electric motor with a rubber cup on the end for starting them. Save a lot of aggrevation. Powerful little motors.
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On Sun, 8 Jan 2006 07:51:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

I thought of radio-controlled as a meaning here, but I couldn't understand how it could apply, and I still don't.

How can any model car use 30 amps? The batteries would run down right away.

By controllers, do you mean the part you hold in your hand or something on the car that controls it?

What makes it 1200 ma if it can put out more than 30 amps. Do you mean mahour?

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to determine the amperage draw run the 12 volts in series thru an ammeter while you drill a 3/8" hole in a 2"x4" piece of wood to load its motor. size the fuse accordingly to be in series with the cigar lighter male plug which is already protected to 10 to 30 amps by your vehicle. there is probably a cigar male plug with fuse at radio shack or pep boys. or read the technical information on the label. or simply shop for less expensive replacement batteries but do the homework on the battery type to match the charger type. we prefer the 12 volt makita cordless drills and found a replacement battery with a built-in led light on it that illuminates the drilling area. watch the weights as the drill voltages go up you may find some 18 volt construction duty cordless drills are excessive weight for minor occasional household uses or at the top of an extension ladder playing with the gutters. use a regular 110 v drill for major wood drilling jobs reduces wear and tear on your battery drills.
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Your comment makes no sense.
What happens when you plug in a table radio (0.3 amps) into a 20 amp socket?
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Yes but whatever you do make sure it's fused. A lighter outlet on your car is of course at the car's fuse panel and you can also use a type of lighter plug that contains a fuse but if you're doing anything involving direct connection to a car or other similarly large battery use some kind of in- line fuse holder. A car battery can put out a huge amount of current in a short, enough to melt small gauge wire and there's always the possibility of a hydrogen explosion at the battery.
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The lighter outlet will probably be fused at somewhere between 10 and 20 amps in the car's fuse block, depending on if it's actually a lighter outlet or an Aux. Power Outlet (same size, but the Aux. Power Outlets sometimes have higher fuse ratings and heavier gage wiring to power external devices, and also may not have the clips at the bottom to retain the lighter element when it's pushed in). In any case, make sure you either use wires that are large enough to support the maximum fuse rating of the outlet, or put in a smaller fuse to prevent turning your "extension" wires into a heater (especially if there is an internal short in the drill that destroyed the original battery). There's not much danger of a hydrogen explosion of the car battery, since the car's fuse will blow before you can draw that much current from it.

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12 v is12 v you wont hurt anything , amperage is power used and capacity. If it is 12v nicad . 12v nicads are dead at 12v, fully charged at 13.5 per cell. So if it is a 10 cell 1.2v pack 12v is dead.and drill will be slow at 12v. Fully charged car batteries are apx 13.4v, so keep battry charged and it will work fine. The original battery operated drill had a separate pack, A fuse wont be necessary except for shorted wiring. You could probably run it at 16 v or more. and not hurt anything.
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m Ransley wrote:

One correction. a fully charged battery is 12.6V to 12.7V at 80 degrees. The charge voltage to keep a battery fully charged is 13.4V
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