Can I replace shower body using Goof plate/ enough room?

I need to change a Delta single handle shower body to a new one, I only hav e access through the front. I saw those goof plates in Lowes, made by Danco , for remodeling from a 3 faucet to single faucet ( shaped like a football) . Even though I don't have a 3 faucet set-up now, I thought I can use this plate anyway. The opening of the template is roughly 7 1/2" high to about 12" wide, oval shaped. Is this enough room to change out a shower body?
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On 11/12/2013 8:57 AM, Mikepier wrote:

I don't know if that would do it.
Why not through back? I cut out the sheetrock, replaced the faucets, tacked back some rock, then hung a mirror over the patch. No need for a fine finish that way.
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Mikepier: I've seen those renovation plates as well, and I believe Home Depot sells them. However, the ones I've seen were made by Moen and Delta. Why use a Danco repair plate when Delta makes one and you have a Delta faucet? Just get on Delta's web site, get their customer service 1-800 phone number and find out what the part number is and who sells them in your area. Even if you describe what you want at Home Depot they should know what you're talking about. I think they're called "renovation plates".
In my humble opinion, 12 inches wide by 7 inches high should be enough room to replace a faucet through, especially a single lever faucet. Those renovation plates are made exactly for the purpose you're planning on using it for. People want to change out old obsolete three handle faucets with a new single lever faucets, but can't access the faucet body through the back of the wall for whatever reason. Their only option is to go through the front, and that means covering up a fairly big hole. Just make sure you caulk well around the renovation plate after the R/R to keep water out of the wall.
Ed Pawlowski;3148368 Wrote:

Ed:
In an apartment block, the walls around every apartment are typically concrete block fire separation walls. Bathrooms in buildings like that will typically have a wood stud wall built a few inches in front of the concrete block wall, and the plaster or drywall will be hung on that wood stud wall.
In my case, I have 21 tub & shower faucets, all of which have a concrete block wall a few inches behind them. So, my T&S faucets can only be replaced from the front as well.
--
nestork

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On Tuesday, November 12, 2013 12:02:42 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

handle shower body to a new one, I only have access through the front. I sa w those goof plates in Lowes, made by Danco, for remodeling from a 3 faucet to single faucet ( shaped like a football). Even though I don't have a 3 f aucet set-up now, I thought I can use this plate anyway. The opening of the template is roughly 7 1/2" high to about 12" wide, oval shaped. Is this en ough room to change out a shower body? > I don't know if that would do it. Why not through back? I cut out the sheetrock, replaced the faucets, tacked back some rock, then hung a mirror over the patch. No need for a fine fini sh that way.
Well, behind the faucet is the outside of a brick wall on the third floor of an Apt bldg, so scratch that idea.
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Mikepier;3148501 Wrote:

I'm always amazed that in the USA there are places that are so warm even in winter that they allow plumbing pipes in exterior walls. Where I live, in Winnipeg Manitoba Canada, that would never be allowed because of the risk of the pipes freezing in winter and cracking.
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On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 00:40:45 +0100, nestork

Crap, there were thousands of houses built in NY with heating pipes in the cantilevered "floor" of raised ranches.
Our water heater is in the garage. In our other house, it's in the attic over the garage. None of the pipes in either place are insulated. It does freeze here but not deep enough or long enough to worry too much about it. I do turn off water to the silcocks, inside, and put a foam boot over them. Probably don't need them but it's cheap sleep.
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On 11/12/2013 06:40 PM, nestork wrote:

In southern Florida it probably freezes maybe once every couple decades or so. However in most places I would consider this a bad idea; I've seen snow as far south as North Carolina. I'm a few miles outside DC (south of Mason-Dixon line) and it's 27 degrees outside at the moment.
nate
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wrote:

A few degrees below freezing for a couple of hours isn't enough to hard freeze a pipe even in an exterior wall.
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