Can I put my range hood on my Fridge Circuit

I'm trying to determing the best setup for my electrical stuff. I can't seem to pull the specs on my Amana 23 Cu fridge yet BUT I was considering hooking up my range hood on the same circuit. My Range hood blower pulls 5 Amps - it's a 1200 CFM unit.
Is this against NEC Code or should I just find an alternate like the lighting circuit.
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I wouldn't know the NEC if I tripped over it...but I think you can do that. The garbage disposal is sposed to be on its own circuit, not sure hwy though. The other biggie is the sump pump, don't want you hair dryer knocking that out.
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Fixed electrical appliances require separate circuits. Dishwasher, disposal ( that one will open the door) stove, microwave.
Will it work, yes. The refer will not pull more than 10 amps.
5 amps for a exhausts hood. Sure hope it is not to loud.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You're right... but why would you be trying to answer Code questions if you don't know the Code?

Not correct.

Common sense, but not a requirement of the Code.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I'm offering an opinion on a code question because nobody else had answered. By saying I don't know the code up front, I'm warning that the info I am conveying is based on what I've heard, not explicit knowledge and electrician would have. There are locales where a sump has to be on a breaker of its own. As for the garbage disposal, per the NEC, it requires a circuit of its own if the manufacturer labeled it as such, if we want to be overly technical about things:
http://www.iaei.org/foc/cmp2.htm#q6
If the government, which has incorporated the NEC as law, would make it available on the web, we would all be better off. As it is, the public cannot see the laws it must follow without buying a book. Imagine if all laws were that way.
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You got a Code cite for that?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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The last code book I ever saw was 1999 NEC, so things may have changed, but at that time, a refridgerator was supposed to be on a separate circut, and that circut was allowed to have 1 other little thing on it, like a clock. (I forget the exact wording, but the essence was, nothing else big on the refridgerator circut). I think a 5-amp range hood probably counts as "big".
From a practical standpoint, it's not likely to create a problem, and if it does, it will be when you turn on the fan and blow the breaker, so you'll likely notice.
--Goedjn
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If the hood was cord and plug connected it could go in a small appliance circuit, as could the fridge. There is no upper limit to the number of 20a small appliance circuits you can have. The fridge exception only says that if you run a 15a to the fridge it has to be dedicated for the fridge, and a clock. If it is a 20 you don't have that limitation.
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alan ( snipped-for-privacy@nospam.hotmail.nospam.com) said...

My knowledge is based on the CEC, but I suspect there is a similar restriction in the NEC...
Prior to the 1994 revision, the CEC allowed only a range hood and/or a clock outlet to be on the same circuit as an outlet intended for a refrigerator.
Since the revision in 1994, ONLY a clock outlet is allowed to be on the same circuit as a refrigerator outlet. So, the answer is, "no".
At one point going into the past, the refrigerator outlet could be on a circuit with other stuff. I don't know just when it was reduced to the range hood/clock before being further reduced to the clock only, but my parents' home was built in 1963 and the refrigerator not only shared the circuit with the range hood, but with the lighting of the hallway. At least when we renovated the kichen in the early 90's, we gave the fridge its own circuit.
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"Never ascribe to malice what can equally be explained by incompetence."
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